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When Can A Demand System Be Described By A Multinomial Logit With Income Effect?

Author

Listed:
  • Jacques-Francois Thisse

    ()

  • Philip Ushchev

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

We show that a wide class of demand systems for dierentiated products, such as those generated by additive preferences, indirectly additive preferences, and Kimball-like homothetic preferences, can be given a multinomial logit foundation provided that the conditional indirect utility is nonlinear and varies with the whole price array.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacques-Francois Thisse & Philip Ushchev, 2016. "When Can A Demand System Be Described By A Multinomial Logit With Income Effect?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 139/EC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:139/ec/2016
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    File URL: https://www.hse.ru/data/2016/06/01/1130394265/139EC2016.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Evgeny Zhelobodko & Sergey Kokovin & Mathieu Parenti & Jacques‐François Thisse, 2012. "Monopolistic Competition: Beyond the Constant Elasticity of Substitution," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 80(6), pages 2765-2784, November.
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    12. Costas Arkolakis & Arnaud Costinot & Dave Donaldson & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 2015. "The Elusive Pro-Competitive Effects of Trade," NBER Working Papers 21370, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Redding, Stephen J. & Weinstein, David E., 2016. "A unified approach to estimating demand and welfare," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67681, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    discrete choice; multinomial logit; demand systems; additive preferences; homothetic preferences;

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets

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