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Not So Demanding: Demand Structure and Firm Behavior

Listed author(s):
  • Mrazova, Monika
  • Neary, J Peter

We show that any well-behaved demand function can be represented by its demand manifold, a smooth curve which relates the elasticity and convexity of demand. This manifold is a sufficient statistic for many comparative statics questions; leads naturally to characterizations of new families of demand functions which nest most of those used in applied economics; and connects assumptions about demand structure with firm behavior and economic performance. In particular, we show that the demand manifold leads to new insights about industry adjustment with heterogeneous firms, and provides a quantitative framework for measuring the effects of globalization.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 11119.

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Date of creation: Feb 2016
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11119
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  1. Swati Dhingra & John Morrow, 2012. "The Impact of Integration on Productivity and Welfare Distortions Under Monopolistic Competition," FIW Working Paper series 088, FIW.
  2. Benkovskis, Konstantins & Wörz, Julia, 2013. "What drives the market share changes? : Price versus non-price factors," BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2013, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  3. Bertoletti, Paolo, 2006. "Logarithmic quasi-homothetic preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 90(3), pages 433-439, March.
  4. Iñaki Aguirre & Simon Cowan & John Vickers, 2010. "Monopoly Price Discrimination and Demand Curvature," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1601-1615, September.
  5. Behrens, Kristian & Murata, Yasusada, 2007. "General equilibrium models of monopolistic competition: A new approach," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 776-787, September.
  6. Eeckhoudt, Louis & Gollier, Christian & Schneider, Thierry, 1995. "Risk-aversion, prudence and temperance: A unified approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 48(3-4), pages 331-336, June.
  7. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
  8. Paolo Bertoletti & Federico Etro, 2013. "Monopolistic Competition: A Dual Approach," DEM Working Papers Series 043, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
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