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Different levels of social organization in the formation of anti-school attitudes among adolescents

Author

Listed:
  • Valeria Ivaniushina

    () (Sociology of Education and Science Lab, National Research University Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg, Senior Researcher.)

  • Daniel Alexandrov

    () (Sociology of Education and Science Lab, National Research University Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg, Professor.)

Abstract

This article analyzes student pro-school/anti-school attitudes on different levels and explores their relation to educational outcomes. We examine the individual level, school level, and clique level predictors (clique is defined as a tight social group within a class social network). Cliques were identified using special software called Kliquefinder. We use multi-level regression approach on a sample of 7300 students from 104 public schools from St.Petersburg. Our findings show that: 1.) Socio-economic differentiation of Russian schools does not lead to a polarization of pro-school/anti-school attitudes in different types of schools; 2.) The polarization of attitudes emerges and is maintained at the clique level; and, 3.) Clique attitudes have a significant impact on educational outcomes (net of a student’s socio-demographic characteristics and individual attitudes).

Suggested Citation

  • Valeria Ivaniushina & Daniel Alexandrov, 2013. "Different levels of social organization in the formation of anti-school attitudes among adolescents," HSE Working papers WP BRP 09/EDU/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:09edu2013
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    File URL: http://www.hse.ru/data/2013/03/02/1293259794/09EDU2013.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Kevin Lang, 2004. "Does School Integration Generate Peer Effects? Evidence from Boston's Metco Program," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1613-1634, December.
    2. Fryer Jr., Roland G. & Torelli, Paul, 2010. "An empirical analysis of 'acting white'," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(5-6), pages 380-396, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    pro-school/anti-school culture; peer effects; social network analysis; cliques.;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General

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