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Good for Living? On the Relation between Globalization and Life Expectancy

  • Bergh, Andreas

    ()

    (Ratio and Lund University)

  • Nilsson, Therese

    ()

    (Lund University)

This paper analyzes the relation between three dimensions of globalization (economic, social and political) and life expectancy using a panel of 92 countries over the period 1970-2005. Using different estimation techniques and sample groupings we find a very robust positive effect from economic globalization on life expectancy, even when controlling for income, nutritional intake, literacy, number of physicians and several other factors. The result also holds when the sample is restricted to low income countries only. For political and social globalization we find no robust effects.

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Paper provided by The Ratio Institute in its series Ratio Working Papers with number 136.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 09 Jun 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0136
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