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Geographic Price Granularity and Investments in Wind Power: Evidence From a Swedish Electricity Market Splitting Reform

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  • Lundin, Erik

    (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))

Abstract

I evaluate the effect of the 2011 Swedish electricity market splitting reform on the allocation of wind power, exploiting a unique data set of all Swedish applications for wind power since 2003. By comparing investments in each price zone before and after the reform using a difference-in-differences (DiD) estimator, I find that 18 percent of all projects constructed by large firms after the reform were allocated to the high price zone due to the reform. This effect is not driven by geographic differences in approval rates, suggesting that the estimated effect also reflects investor preferences. Small, sometimes locally owned firms, did not react to the reform. A likely reason is that the locational choice set of small firms usually only include one of the price zones. A triple differences estimator using small firms as a control group, and a nearest neighbor matching estimator comparing areas with similar prerequisites for wind power, largely confirm the main DiD results. However, due to the comparatively few applications submitted prior to the announcement of the reform, the parallel trends assumption cannot be entirely verified, suggesting that results should be interpreted with care.

Suggested Citation

  • Lundin, Erik, 2021. "Geographic Price Granularity and Investments in Wind Power: Evidence From a Swedish Electricity Market Splitting Reform," Working Paper Series 1412, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:1412
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    Cited by:

    1. Lundin, Erik, 2023. "Wind Power Approval, Decentralization, and NIMBYism: Evidence from the Swedish Greens," Working Paper Series 1464, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Michael G. Pollitt, 2023. "Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) for electricity in Europe? The untold story," Working Papers EPRG2318, Energy Policy Research Group, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge.
    3. Samuli Honkapuro & Jasmin Jaanto & Salla Annala, 2023. "A Systematic Review of European Electricity Market Design Options," Energies, MDPI, vol. 16(9), pages 1-26, April.
    4. Sonnsjö, Hannes, 2024. "What we talk about when we talk about electricity: A thematic analysis of recent political debates on Swedish electricity supply," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 187(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Electricity market design; Zonal market; Electricity market integration; Spatial price dispersion; Wind power; Wholesale electricity market; Nord Pool;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • D47 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Market Design
    • Q21 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy

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