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When Foul Play Seems Fair: Exploring the Link between Just Deserts and Honesty

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Listed:
  • Fabio Galeotti

    (GATE Lyon Saint-Étienne - Groupe d'analyse et de théorie économique - ENS Lyon - École normale supérieure - Lyon - UL2 - Université Lumière - Lyon 2 - UCBL - Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 - Université de Lyon - UJM - Université Jean Monnet [Saint-Étienne] - Université de Lyon - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Reuben Kline

    (SBU - Stony Brook University [The State University of New York])

  • Raimondello Orsini

    (DAIS - Computer Science - Universita di Venezia - Ca' Foscari)

Abstract

The distributive justice norm of " just deserts " — i.e. the notion that one gets what one deserves — is an essential norm in a market society, and honesty is an important factor in economic and social exchange. We experimentally investigate the effect of violations of the distributive justice norm of " just deserts " on honesty in a setting where behaving dishonestly entails income redistribution. We find that the violation of the just deserts norm results in a greater propensity toward dishonesty. We then test a more general proposition that violations of just deserts induce dishonesty, even in cases where dishonesty does not have redistributive consequences. Our results confirm this proposition but only for cases in which the v iolation of just deserts also entails income inequality. Abstract The distributive justice norm of " just deserts " —i.e. the notion that one gets what

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio Galeotti & Reuben Kline & Raimondello Orsini, 2017. "When Foul Play Seems Fair: Exploring the Link between Just Deserts and Honesty," Working Papers halshs-01579214, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01579214
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01579214
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Meritocracy; Equity; Dishonesty; Just Deserts; Experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

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