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Games Played on Networks

Author

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  • Yann Bramoullé

    () (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Rachel Kranton

    (Duke University, Department of Economics - Duke University [Durham])

Abstract

This chapter studies games played on fixed networks. These games capture a wide variety of economic settings including local public goods, peer effects, and technology adoption. We establish a common analytical framework to study a wide game class. We unearth new connections between games in the literature and in particular between those with binary actions, like coordination and best-shot games, and those with continuous actions and linear best replies. We review and advance existing results by showing how they tie together within the common framework. We discuss the game-theoretic underpinnings of key notions including Bonacich centrality, maximal independent sets, and the lowest and largest eigenvalue. We study the interplay of individual heterogeneity and the network and we develop a new notion - interdependence - to analyze how a shock to one agent affects the action of another agent. We outline directions for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Yann Bramoullé & Rachel Kranton, 2015. "Games Played on Networks," Working Papers halshs-01180657, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01180657
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01180657
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cao, Zhigang & Chen, Xujin & Qin, Cheng-Zhong & Wang, Changjun & Yang, Xiaoguang, 2018. "Embedding games with strategic complements into games with strategic substitutes," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 45-51.
    2. Allouch, Nizar, 2017. "The cost of segregation in (social) networks," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 329-342.
    3. Ewerhart, Christian & Valkanova, Kremena, 2020. "Fictitious play in networks," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 182-206.
    4. Ushchev, Philip & Zenou, Yves, 2020. "Social norms in networks," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 185(C).
    5. Parise, Francesca & Ozdaglar, Asuman, 2019. "A variational inequality framework for network games: Existence, uniqueness, convergence and sensitivity analysis," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 47-82.
    6. Frank Emmert-Streib & Aliyu Musa & Kestutis Baltakys & Juho Kanniainen & Shailesh Tripathi & Olli Yli-Harja & Herbert Jodlbauer & Matthias Dehmer, 2017. "Computational Analysis of the structural properties of Economic and Financial Networks," Papers 1710.04455, arXiv.org.
    7. Walsh, A. M., 2019. "Games on Multi-Layer Networks," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1954, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    coordination; peer effects; network games; fixed networks; interdependence;
    All these keywords.

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