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Returns to firm-provided training in France: Evidence on mobility and wages


  • Arna Chéron

    (GAINS - Groupe d'Analyse des Itinéraires et des Niveaux Salariaux - UM - Université du Maine)

  • Bénédicte Rouland

    (GAINS - Groupe d'Analyse des Itinéraires et des Niveaux Salariaux - UM - Université du Maine)

  • François Charles Wolff

    () (LEMNA - LABORATOIRE D'economie et de management de nantes - UN - Université de Nantes)


While numerous studies have provided selectivity-corrected estimates of the wage returns to training both in the US and in European countries, less is known about the impact of training on mobility on the labour market. In this paper, we estimate the impact of firmprovided training on both the employment-unemployment and job-to-job transitions using French panel data covering the 1998-2000 period. We find that participating to a training session in 1998 reduces the probability to experience an employment-unemployment transition during the period and that the probability to switch firms is higher among untrained workers. Additional results on the effect of training on wages indicate that training participation in 1998 increases wages by 7% in 2000, the wage premium remaining flat along the wage distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Arna Chéron & Bénédicte Rouland & François Charles Wolff, 2010. "Returns to firm-provided training in France: Evidence on mobility and wages," Working Papers halshs-00809753, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00809753
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. William H. Greene, 1998. "Gender Economics Courses in Liberal Arts Colleges: Further Results," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 291-300, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Dietz & Thomas Zwick, 2016. "The retention effect of training – portability, visibility, and credibility," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0113, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    2. Pierre-Jean Messe & Benedicte Rouland, 2012. "Stricter employment protection and firms’ incentives to train: The case of French older workers," TEPP Working Paper 2012-04, TEPP.
    3. Nicola Brandt, 2015. "Vocational training and adult learning for better skills in France," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1260, OECD Publishing.


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