IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/brjirl/v38y2000i2p261-275.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Impact of Training on Labour Mobility: Individual and Firm-level Evidence from Britain

Author

Listed:
  • Francis Green
  • Alan Felstead
  • Ken Mayhew
  • Alan Pack

Abstract

We investigate the impact of different types of training on the mobility expectations of workers, using three surveys. Most training episodes produce some transferable skills, and most transferable training is paid for by employers. Overall, training has no impact on mobility in three out of every five cases; the remaining cases are split equally between those where training increases and those where it decreases mobility. We find that training is more likely to lead to lower mobility when it is less transferable to other firms, is sponsored by firms, and where its objectives include increasing the identification of employees with corporate objectives. Copyright Blackwell Publishers Ltd/London School of Economics 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • Francis Green & Alan Felstead & Ken Mayhew & Alan Pack, 2000. "The Impact of Training on Labour Mobility: Individual and Firm-level Evidence from Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 261-275, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:38:y:2000:i:2:p:261-275
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1467-8543.00162
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rossana Patron, 2013. "Recovery not fast enough? Notes on speeding up," Discussion Papers 13/06, University of Nottingham, School of Economics.
    2. William Collier & Francis Green & Young-Bae Kim & John Peirson, 2011. "Education, Training and Economic Performance: Evidence from Establishment Survival Data," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 336-361, December.
    3. Daniel Dietz & Thomas Zwick, 2016. "The retention effect of training – portability, visibility, and credibility," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0113, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    4. Shahzad, Saqib & Khan, Zunnoorain & Khan, Shahzad, 2015. "CONTRIBUTING FACTORS OF EMPLOYEE’S PERFORMANCE: A CASE STUDY OF LOCAL NGOs IN PESHAWAR CITY," UTMS Journal of Economics, University of Tourism and Management, Skopje, Macedonia, vol. 6(1), pages 127-134.
    5. Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C., 2011. "Market imperfections and firm-sponsored training," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 712-722, October.
    6. C Green & J S Heywood, 2007. "Does profit sharing increase training by reducing turnover?," Working Papers 589032, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    7. Joseph M. Ng’ang’a & Dishon Wanjere & Robert K.W. Egessa, 2015. "Influence of Technical Training on Organizational Performance of Sugar Industry in the South Nyanza Zone of Kenya," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 5(9), pages 106-124, September.
    8. Koster Fleur & Grip Andries de & Fouarge Didier, 2009. "Does Perceived Support in Employee Development Affect Personnel Turnover?," ROA Research Memorandum 008, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    9. Rahmah Ismail & Zulridah Noor & Abd Awang, 2011. "Impact of Training under Human Resource Development Limited on Workers’ Mobility in Selected Malaysian Services Sector," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 1(2), pages 146-159, December.
    10. Asplund, Rita, 2004. "The Provision and Effects of Company Training. A brief review of the literature," Discussion Papers 907, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    11. Ryan, Paul & Gospel, Howard & Lewis, Paul, 2006. "Large employers and apprenticeship training in Britain," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment SP I 2006-104, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    12. Arnaud Chéron & Bénédicte Rouland & François-Charles Wolf, 2010. "Returns to firm-provided training in France:Evidence on mobility and wages," TEPP Working Paper 2010-10, TEPP.
    13. Yanick Labrie & Claude Montmarquette, 2005. "La formation qualifiante et transférable en milieu de travail," CIRANO Project Reports 2005rp-04, CIRANO.
    14. Huanxing Yang, 2008. "Efficiency Wages And Subjective Performance Pay," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(2), pages 179-196, April.
    15. Inge Sieben, 2007. "Does training trigger turnover - or not?," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 21(3), pages 397-416, September.
    16. Geoff Mason & Kate Bishop, 2015. "The Impact of Recession on Adult Training: Evidence from the United Kingdom in 2008–2009," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 53(4), pages 736-759, December.
    17. Rossana Patrón, 2012. "Short-term specificity and training: Key issues for economic restructuring," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0212, Department of Economics - dECON.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:38:y:2000:i:2:p:261-275. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/lsepsuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.