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The Fall in Income Inequality during COVID-19 in Five European Countries

Author

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  • Andrew Clark

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

  • Conchita d'Ambrosio

    (University of Luxembourg [Luxembourg])

  • Anthony Lepinteur

    (University of Luxembourg [Luxembourg])

Abstract

We here use panel data from the COME-HERE survey to track income inequality during COVID-19 in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Sweden. Relative inequality in equivalent household disposable income among individuals changed in a hump-shaped way over 2020. An initial rise from January to May was more than reversed by September. Absolute inequality also fell over this period. As such, policy responses may have been of more benefit for the poorer than for the richer.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Clark & Conchita d'Ambrosio & Anthony Lepinteur, 2021. "The Fall in Income Inequality during COVID-19 in Five European Countries," PSE Working Papers halshs-03185534, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-03185534
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-03185534
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    Cited by:

    1. Ainaa, Carmen & Brunetti, Irene & Mussida, Chiara & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2021. "Who lost the most? Distributive effects of COVID-19 pandemic," GLO Discussion Paper Series 829, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Nikolay Angelov & Daniel Waldenström, 2021. "Covid-19 and Income Inequality: Evidence from Monthly Population Registers," CESifo Working Paper Series 9178, CESifo.
    3. Waldenström, Daniel & Angelov, Nikolay, 2021. "COVID-19 and Income Inequality: Evidence from Monthly Population Registers," Working Paper Series 1396, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    4. Abigail Hurwitz & Olivia S. Mitchell & Orly Sade, 2021. "Longevity Perceptions and Saving Decisions during the COVID-19 Outbreak: An Experimental Investigation," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 111, pages 297-301, May.
    5. Angelov, Nikolay & Waldenström, Daniel, 2021. "COVID-19 and Income Inequality: Evidence from Monthly Population Registers," IZA Policy Papers 178, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Andrew E. Clark & Anthony Lepinteur, 2021. "Pandemic Policy and Life Satisfaction in Europe," PSE Working Papers halshs-03202345, HAL.
    7. Christl, Michael & De Poli, Silvia & Kucsera, Dénes & Lorenz, Hanno, 2021. "COVID-19 and (gender) inequality in income: the impact of discretionary policy measures in Austria," GLO Discussion Paper Series 917, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    8. Giorgia Menta, 2021. "Poverty in the COVID-19 Era: Real Time Data Analysis on Five European Countries," Working Papers 568, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    COVID-19; COME-HERE; Income Inequality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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