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Employment and decent work in the era of flexicurity

Author

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  • Robert Boyer

    (PJSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

This paper challenges the conventional wisdom that the dynamism of employment is always contradictory to the enforcement of some forms of security for workers. Contemporary theorizing now recognizes the specificity of the wage-labour nexus. Consequently, minimum security is required for good economic performance by firms and national economies. A comparative analysis of OECD countries shows that the extended security promoted by welfare systems has not been detrimental to innovation, growth and job creation. Developing countries cannot immediately catch up with the emerging standards of flexicurity but the methodology of employment diagnosis might help them in designing security/flexibility configurations tailored according to their domestic economic specialization, social values and political choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Boyer, 2006. "Employment and decent work in the era of flexicurity," PSE Working Papers halshs-00590452, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-00590452
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00590452
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    File URL: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00590452/document
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Eswar S. Prasad & Kenneth Rogoff & Shang-Jin Wei & M. Ayhan Kose, 2007. "Financial Globalization, Growth and Volatility in Developing Countries," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization and Poverty, pages 457-516 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Eliasson, Gunnar, 1984. "Micro heterogeneity of firms and the stability of industrial growth," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 5(3-4), pages 249-274.
    5. Amable, Bruno, 2003. "The Diversity of Modern Capitalism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199261147.
    6. Ricardo Hausmann & Bailey Klinger, 2008. "Growth Diagnostics: Perú," Research Department Publications 2005, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    7. Andrea Bassanini & Stefano Scarpetta & Ignazio Visco, 2000. "Knowledge technology and economic growth: recent evidence from OECD countries," Working Paper Research 06, National Bank of Belgium.
    8. Fujiki, Hiroshi & Nakada, Sachiko-Kuroda & Tachibanaki, Toshiaki, 2001. "Structural Issues in the Japanese Labor Market: An Era of Variety, Equity, and Efficiency or an Era of Bipolarization?," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 19(S1), pages 177-208, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lucie Davoine & Christine Erhel & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, 2008. "A Taxonomy of European Labour Markets Using Quality Indicators," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00317280, HAL.
    2. Santos, Miguel, 2010. "School to Work Transition, Employment Attainment and VET. Theories Guide for Policy Makers," MPRA Paper 24056, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Santos, Miguel, 2010. "From Training to Labour Market. Holocletic Model," MPRA Paper 26617, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Shaianne T. Osterreich, 2013. "Precarious Work in Global Exports: The Case of Indonesia," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(2), pages 273-293, April.
    5. Mansour Omeira & Simel Esim & Sufyan Alissa, 2008. "Labor Governance and Economic Reform in the Middle East and North Africa: Lessons from Nordic Countries," Working Papers 436, Economic Research Forum, revised 09 Jan 2008.
    6. Miguel Baião Santos, 2010. "Inserção no Mercado de Trabalho e Formação Profissional - Guia Teórico para Decisores," Working Papers wp052010, Socius, Socio-Economics Research Centre at the School of Economics and Management (ISEG) of the Technical University of Lisbon.

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