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Entrepreneurship, technological change and endogenous returns to ability

  • Patricia Crifo

    (CECO - Laboratoire d'econometrie de l'école polytechnique - CNRS : UMR7657 - Polytechnique - X)

  • Hind Sami

    (CECO - Laboratoire d'econometrie de l'école polytechnique - CNRS : UMR7657 - Polytechnique - X)

Cet article propose un modèle de choix entrepeneurial mettant en évidence une relation non monotone entre le progrès technique et la sélection des entrepreneurs sur leurs capacités individuelles. Les choix de création d'entreprises sont examinés dans un modèle à deux périodes avec incertitude dans lequel les entrepreneurs décident de continuer ou abandonner leur projet en fonction de l'environnement technologique et de leurs compétences. On analyse comment le progrès technique modifie l'avantage comparatif des entrepreneurs et la dynamique de création d'entreprises dans l'économie. Au-delà d'un seuil de progrès technique, un taux de progrès technologique rapide accroît l'efficacité des projets créés et réduit le nombre d'entrepreneurs qui choisissent de poursuivre, dans l'étape de développement, les projets les moins efficaces. Un progrès technique endogène, fondé sur un mécanisme d'apprentissage par la pratique, renforce ce résultat. Le progrès technique a tendance à exercer un effet "apurant" sur l'activité entrepreneuriale et modifie la perception du marché vis-à-vis de la création d'entreprises.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number hal-00243037.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Publication status: Published, Economic Modelling, 2008, 25, 4, 585-604
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00243037
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00243037/en/
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