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Peltzman on Ice: Evidence on Compensating Behavior Using a Natural Experiment from Ice Hockey

Author

Listed:
  • Alberto Chong

    () (Institute for International Economic Policy, George Washington University)

  • Pascal Restrepo

    () (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract

We provide evidence of the Peltzman effect by tracking the professional path of each hockey player that ended up in the National Hockey League from 2001 to 2006. We take advantage of the fact that visor use has not always been compulsory throughout a player's career, which allows us to compare the change in behavior of users and non-users of visors when they are forced to use them. We find that whereas the average penalty minutes per game is 0.8, visors cause a substantial increase of 0.2 penalty minutes per game. Players become more aggressive when forced to wear a visor, partially offsetting its protective effect and creating potential spillover effects to other players.

Suggested Citation

  • Alberto Chong & Pascal Restrepo, 2011. "Peltzman on Ice: Evidence on Compensating Behavior Using a Natural Experiment from Ice Hockey," Working Papers 2011-12, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2011-12
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    File URL: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/Chong_IIEPWP2011-12.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Russell S. Sobel & Todd M. Nesbit, 2007. "Automobile Safety Regulation and the Incentive to Drive Recklessly: Evidence from NASCAR," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 74(1), pages 71-84, July.
    2. Loeb, Peter D, 1995. "The Effectiveness of Seat-Belt Legislation in Reducing Injury Rates in Texas," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 81-84, May.
    3. Adam Pope & Robert Tollison, 2010. "“Rubbin’ is racin''': evidence of the Peltzman effect from NASCAR," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(3), pages 507-513, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Peltzman Effect; Ice Hockey; Compensating Behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law
    • K23 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Regulated Industries and Administrative Law
    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General

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