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Conformity and truthful voting under different voting rules

Author

Listed:
  • Bernardo Moreno

    (Departamento de Teoría e Historia Econñomica, Universidad de Málaga.)

  • Maria del Pino Ramos-Sosa

    (Departamento de Economia, Universidad Loyola Andalucia.)

  • Ismael Rodriguez-Lara

    () (Department of Economic Theory and Economic History, University of Granada.)

Abstract

We induce conformity in a binary-decision voting game in which one of the options require certain support (majority, supermajority or unanimity) to be the adopted decision. We consider heterogenous types of voters in that each of them prefer a different outcome in the voting game. We demonstrate theoretically that truthful voting is the unique equilibrium without conformity for each possible voting rule. Introducing conformity enlarges the set of equilibria, which includes voting profiles in which agents do not necessarily vote for their preferred option. If we account for the presence of non-conformist honest voters that vote truthfully for their preferred option, truthful voting is more pervasive for conformist voters in equilibrium. In our setting, the effects of conformity and honest voters on the likelihood of voting truthfully depend on the voting rule that determines whether or not voters are in a decisive group to implement one of the decisions. We provide empirical support for our theoretical predictions by means of a laboratory experiment. Our findings indeed suggest an interplay between the voting rule and the willingness to conform.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernardo Moreno & Maria del Pino Ramos-Sosa & Ismael Rodriguez-Lara, 2019. "Conformity and truthful voting under different voting rules," ThE Papers 19/04, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  • Handle: RePEc:gra:wpaper:19/04
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    truthful voting; conformity; honest voters; voting rules; experimental evidence.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior

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