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The price of modern maritime piracy

A growing body of literature has recently focused on the economic origins and consequences of modern maritime piracy and on the perception that the international community has failed to control it. This paper aims to investigate maritime transport costs as one of the channels through which modern maritime piracy could have a major impact on the global economy. A transportcost equation is estimated using a newly released dataset on maritime transport cost from the OECD together with data on maritime piracy from the IMB. Our results show that maritime piracy significantly increases trade cost between Europe and Asia.

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Paper provided by Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research in its series Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers with number 213.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 27 Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:got:iaidps:213
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  1. Anja Shortland, 2010. "The Business of Piracy in Somalia," Weekly Report, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 6(23), pages 182-186.
  2. Rikhil Bhavnani & Natalia T. Tamirisa & Arvind Subramanian & David T. Coe, 2002. "The Missing Globalization Puzzle," IMF Working Papers 02/171, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Olaf J. de Groot & Anja Shortland, 2010. "Gov-arrrgh-nance: Jolly Rogers and Dodgy Rulers," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1063, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. de Groot, Olaf J. & Rablen, Matthew D. & Shortland, Anja, 2011. "Gov-Aargh-Nance – “Even Criminals Need Law And Order”," NEPS Working Papers 7/2011, Network of European Peace Scientists.
  5. Maximo Mejia & Pierre Cariou & Francois-Charles Wolff, 2009. "Is maritime piracy random?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(9), pages 891-895.
  6. Olaf Jonkeren & Erhan Demirel & Jos van Ommeren & Piet Rietveld, 2008. "Endogenous Transport Prices and Trade Imbalances," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-088/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  7. Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso & Gordon Wilmsmeier, 2008. "Determinants of Maritime Transport Costs. A Panel Data Analysis for Latin American Trade," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 172, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  8. James E. Anderson & Douglas Marcouiller, S.J., 1999. "Insecurity and the Pattern of Trade: An Empirical Investigation," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 418, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 03 Aug 2000.
  9. I Mart�nez-Zarzoso & L Garc�a-Men�ndez & C Su�rez-Burguet, 2003. "Impact of Transport Costs on International Trade: The Case of Spanish Ceramic Exports," Maritime Economics and Logistics, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 5(2), pages 179-198, June.
  10. Inmaculada Martinez-Zarzoso & Celestino Suarez-Burguet, 2005. "Transport costs and trade: Empirical evidence for Latin American imports from the European union," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 353-371.
  11. Jane Korinek & Patricia Sourdin, 2009. "Clarifying Trade Costs: Maritime Transport and its Effect on Agricultural Trade," OECD Trade Policy Papers 92, OECD Publishing.
  12. Helen B Bendall, 2010. "Cost of piracy: A comparative voyage approach," Maritime Economics and Logistics, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 12(2), pages 178-195, June.
  13. Baier, Scott L. & Bergstrand, Jeffrey H., 2001. "The growth of world trade: tariffs, transport costs, and income similarity," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 1-27, February.
  14. Mirza, Daniel & Verdier, Thierry, 2008. "International trade, security and transnational terrorism: Theory and a survey of empirics," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 179-194, June.
  15. James E. Anderson & Douglas Marcouiller, S.J., 1997. "Anarchy and Autarky: Endogenous Predation as a Barrier to Trade," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 383, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 01 Oct 2001.
  16. Sami Bensassi & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2011. "How Costly is Modern Maritime Piracy for the International Community?," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 208, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  17. Limao, Nuno & Venables, Anthony J., 1999. "Infrastructure, geographical disadvantage, and transport costs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2257, The World Bank.
  18. Dollar, David & Micco, Alejandro & Clark, Ximena, 2002. "Maritime transport costs and port efficiency," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2781, The World Bank.
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