IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/gmf/wpaper/2014-04..html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Agriculture in Portugal: linkages with industry and services

Author

Listed:
  • João Gaspar

    (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, Portugal)

  • Gilson Pina

    (Faculty opf Economics, University of Coimbra, Portugal)

  • Marta C. N. Simões

    () (GEMF / Faculty opf Economics, University of Coimbra, Portugal)

Abstract

We investigate the links between agriculture and non-agricultural sectors in Portugal by assessing the existence of long-run relationships and causality among the three main sectors of activity in terms of value added and labour productivity using a VAR model for the period 1970-2006. Agricultural value added is found to be both weakly and strongly exogenous so it exerted no influence in the other sectors expansion nor was it influenced by their growth. The results with labour productivity show that productivity gains in services and industry feedback into productivity growth in agriculture, although the link is weaker in the industry case. Portuguese decision makers believe that restoring agricultural production plays an important role in overcoming the country’s current difficulties. However, they need to pay more attention to the potential synergies between agricultural and non-agricultural sectors, and provide agriculture with the necessary technological and organizational capabilities to benefit from industry and services expansion. Our results indicate that this does not seem to have happened in the past, a situation that should be improved in order to restore agricultural production and promote overall growth.

Suggested Citation

  • João Gaspar & Gilson Pina & Marta C. N. Simões, 2014. "Agriculture in Portugal: linkages with industry and services," GEMF Working Papers 2014-04, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
  • Handle: RePEc:gmf:wpaper:2014-04.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.uc.pt/feuc/gemf/working_papers/pdf/2014/gemf_2014-04
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    2. Niels‐Hugo Blunch & Dorte Verner, 2006. "Shared Sectoral Growth Versus the Dual Economy Model: Evidence from Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, and Zimbabwe," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 18(3), pages 283-308.
    3. Restuccia, Diego & Yang, Dennis Tao & Zhu, Xiaodong, 2008. "Agriculture and aggregate productivity: A quantitative cross-country analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 234-250, March.
    4. Silva, Ester G. & Teixeira, Aurora A.C., 2008. "Surveying structural change: Seminal contributions and a bibliometric account," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 273-300, December.
    5. Richard Tiffin & Xavier Irz, 2006. "Is agriculture the engine of growth?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(1), pages 79-89, July.
    6. Kanwar, Sunil, 2000. "Does the Dog Wag the Tail or the Tail the Dog? Cointegration of Indian Agriculture with Nonagriculture," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 533-556, September.
    7. Mary O'Mahony & Marcel P. Timmer, 2009. "Output, Input and Productivity Measures at the Industry Level: The EU KLEMS Database," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(538), pages 374-403, June.
    8. Antonio Andreoni, 2011. "Manufacturing Agrarian Change - Agricultural production, inter-sectoral learning and technological capabilities," DRUID Working Papers 11-13, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
    9. Margarida Duarte & Diego Restuccia, 2007. "The structural transformation and aggregate productivity in Portugal," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer;Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestao, vol. 6(1), pages 23-46, April.
    10. Jens J. Krüger, 2008. "Productivity And Structural Change: A Review Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 330-363, April.
    11. Johansen, Søren & Juselius, Katarina, 1992. "Testing structural hypotheses in a multivariate cointegration analysis of the PPP and the UIP for UK," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1-3), pages 211-244.
    12. N. Gemmell & T. A. Lloyd & M. Mathew, 2000. "Agricultural Growth and Inter-Sectoral Linkages in a Developing Economy," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 353-370.
    13. Dowrick, Steve & Gemmell, Norman, 1991. "Industrialisation, Catching Up and Economic Growth: A Comparative Study across the World's Capitalist Economies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(405), pages 263-275, March.
    14. Fiess, Norbert M. & Verner, Dorte, 2001. "Intersectoral dynamics and economic growth in Ecuador," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2514, The World Bank.
    15. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
    16. Lains, Pedro, 2003. "New wine in old bottles: Output and productivity trends in Portuguese agriculture, 1850 1950," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(01), pages 43-72, April.
    17. Santos Pereira, Álvaro & Lains, Pedro, 2010. "From an agrarian society to a knowledge economy : Portugal, 1950-2010," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp10-09, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    18. Shujie Yao, 1994. "Cointegration analysis of agriculture and non-agricultural sectors in the Chinese economy 1952-92," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(12), pages 227-229.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agriculture; industry; services; sectoral linkages; Portugal; VAR.;

    JEL classification:

    • Q19 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Other
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gmf:wpaper:2014-04.. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ana Seiça). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cebucpt.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.