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Dynamics of transformation: Insights from an exploratory review of rice farming in the Kpong irrigation project:

  • Takeshima, Hiroyuki
  • Jimah, Kipo
  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara
  • Diao, Xinshen
  • Funk, Rebecca Lee

Agriculture in African South of the Sahara (SSA) can be transformed if the right public support is provided at the initial stage, and it can sustain itself once the enabling environment is put in place. Successes are also specific to the location of projects. In Ghana, interesting insights are obtained from the successful Kpong Irrigation Project (KIP), contrasted with other major irrigation projects in the country. Through an exploratory review, we describe how a productive system evolved in KIP and how public support for critical aspects (accumulation of crop husbandry knowledge, selection and supply of profitable varieties, and mechanization of land preparation) might have created a productive environment that the private sector could enter and fill in the market for credit, processing, mechanization of harvesting, and other institutional voids that typically have constrained agricultural transformation in the rest of SSA.

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1272.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1272
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  1. Mushtaq, Shahbaz & Maraseni, Tek Narayan & Maroulis, Jerry & Hafeez, Mohsin, 2009. "Energy and water tradeoffs in enhancing food security: A selective international assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 3635-3644, September.
  2. Banful, Afua Branoah, 2009. "Operational details of the 2008 fertilizer subsidy in Ghana: Preliminary report," GSSP working papers 18, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Nakano, Yuko & Bamba, Ibrahim & Diagne, Aliou & Otsuka, Keijiro & Kajisa, Kei, 2011. "The possibility of a rice green revolution in large-scale irrigation schemes in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5560, The World Bank.
  4. Delgado, Christopher L. & Hopkins, Jane & Kelly , Valerie & Hazell, P. B. R. & McKenna, Anna A. & Gruhn, Peter & Hojjati, Behjat & Sil, Jayashree & Courbois, Claude, 1998. "Agricultural growth linkages in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Research reports 107, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Namara, Regassa E. & Horowitz, Leah & Nyamadi, Ben & Barry, Boubacar, 2011. "Irrigation development in Ghana: Past experiences, emerging opportunities, and future directions," GSSP working papers 27, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Sanzidur Rahman & Aree Wiboonpongse & Songsak Sriboonchitta & Yaovarate Chaovanapoonphol, 2009. "Production Efficiency of Jasmine Rice Producers in Northern and North-eastern Thailand," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(2), pages 419-435.
  7. Cudjoe, Godsway & Breisinger, Clemens & Diao, Xinshen, 2010. "Local impacts of a global crisis: Food price transmission, consumer welfare and poverty in Ghana," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 294-302, August.
  8. Nin-Pratt, Alejandro & Johnson, Michael & Magalhaes, Eduardo & Diao, Xinshen & You, Liang & Chamberlin, Jordan, 2009. "Priorities for realizing the potential to increase agricultural productivity and growth in Western and Central Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 876, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  9. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
  10. Inocencio, Arlene & Kikuchi, Masao & Tonosaki, Manabu & Maruyama, Atsushi & Merrey, Douglas & Sally, Hilmy & de Jong, Ijsbrand, 2007. "Costs and performance of irrigation projects: A comparison of Sub-Saharan Africa and other developing regions," IWMI Research Reports H036214, International Water Management Institute.
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