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Measuring the contribution of Bt cotton adoption to India's cotton yields leap:

  • Gruere, Guillaume P.
  • Sun, Yan

While a number of empirical studies have demonstrated the role of Bt cotton adoption in increasing Indian cotton productivity at the farm level, there has been questioning around the overall contribution of Bt cotton to the average cotton yield increase observed these last ten years in India. This study examines the contribution of Bt cotton adoption to long- term average cotton yields in India using a panel data analysis of production variables in nine Indian cotton-producing states from 1975 to 2009. The results show that Bt cotton contributed 19 percent of total yield growth over time, or between 0.3 percent and 0.4 percent per percentage adoption every year since its introduction. Besides Bt cotton, the use of fertilizer and the increased adoption of hybrid seeds appear to have contributed to the yield increase over time. However, if official Bt cotton adoption contributed to increased yield after 2005, unofficial Bt cotton might also have been part of the observed increase of yields starting in 2002, the year of its official introduction in India.

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1170.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1170
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  1. Subramanian, Arjunan & Qaim, Matin, 2009. "Village-wide Effects of Agricultural Biotechnology: The Case of Bt Cotton in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 256-267, January.
  2. Hausman, Jerry A, 1978. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(6), pages 1251-71, November.
  3. N. Lalitha & Carl E. Pray & Bharat Ramaswami, 2008. "The Limits of intellectual property rights: Lessons from the spread of illegal transgenic seeds in India," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 08-06, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.
  4. Gruere, Guillaume & Mehta-Bhatt, Purvi & Sengupta, Debdatta, 2008. "Bt Cotton and farmer suicides in India: Reviewing the evidence," IFPRI discussion papers 808, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Robert Finger & Nadja El Benni & Timo Kaphengst & Clive Evans & Sophie Herbert & Bernard Lehmann & Stephen Morse & Nataliya Stupak, 2011. "A Meta Analysis on Farm-Level Costs and Benefits of GM Crops," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(5), pages 743-762, May.
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