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Nonmarket networks among migrants

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  • Yamauchi, Futoshi
  • Tanabe, Sakiko

Abstract

"This paper examines nonmarket interactions among migrants from same origins in the urban labor market of Bangkok, Thailand. We test whether the labor-market performance of previous migrants has externalities to that of new migrants who moved from the same province of origin. Our empirical results, which control origin fixed effects, time-fixed effects, and origin/year-specific correlated shocks, show that (1) the relative size of the migrant population in the market decreases employment probabilities of new migrants (negative substitution effect), (2) the employment probability of previous migrants increases those of new migrants (positive externalities), and (3) when the employment probability of previous migrants approaches to unity, the size effect becomes positive, showing informational scale economies. The results imply that the positive informational scale effect dominates the negative substitution effect when the efficiency of previous migrants is sufficiently high in the labor market." Authors' Abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Yamauchi, Futoshi & Tanabe, Sakiko, 2003. "Nonmarket networks among migrants," FCND discussion papers 169, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcnddp:169
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2003. "Are experience and schooling complementary?," FCND discussion papers 166, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Lall, Somik V. & Selod, Harris & Shalizi, Zmarak, 2006. "Rural-urban migration in developing countries : a survey of theoretical predictions and empirical findings," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3915, The World Bank.
    3. Stéphane Mahuteau & P.N. (Raja) Junankar, 2008. "Do Migrants get Good Jobs in Australia? The Role of Ethnic Networks in Job Search," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 115-130, September.
    4. Kudo, Yuya, 2012. "Returns to migration : the role of educational attainment in rural Tanzania," IDE Discussion Papers 322, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    5. Mahuteau, Stephane & Junankar, Pramod, 2007. "Do Migrants succeed in the Australian Labour Market? Furher Evidence on Job Quality," MPRA Paper 8703, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Mar 2008.
    6. Ali Berker, 2010. "The Labor Market Consequences of Internal Migration in Turkey," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1029, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.

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