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Social networks and changes in contraceptive use over time: Evidence from a longitudinal study in rural Kenya

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  • Jere Behrman

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  • Hans-Peter Kohler
  • Susan Watkins

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  • Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & Susan Watkins, 2002. "Social networks and changes in contraceptive use over time: Evidence from a longitudinal study in rural Kenya," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(4), pages 713-738, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:39:y:2002:i:4:p:713-738
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2002.0033
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    2. Willis, Robert J, 1973. "A New Approach to the Economic Theory of Fertility Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 14-64, Part II, .
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    Cited by:

    1. Gayen, Kaberi & Raeside, Robert, 2010. "Social networks and contraception practice of women in rural Bangladesh," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(9), pages 1584-1592, November.
    2. H Peyton Young, 2014. "The Evolution of Social Norms," Economics Series Working Papers 726, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    3. Kai-Wen Cheng, 2011. "The Effect of Contraceptive Knowledge on Fertility: The Roles of Mass Media and Social Networks," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 257-267, June.
    4. Nan Astone & Jacinda Dariotis & Freya Sonenstein & Joseph Pleck & Kathryn Hynes, 2010. "Men’s Work Efforts and the Transition to Fatherhood," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 3-13, March.
    5. Kodzi, Ivy A. & Johnson, David R. & Casterline, John B., 2012. "To have or not to have another child: Life cycle, health and cost considerations of Ghanaian women," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(7), pages 966-972.
    6. FFF1Kirsten P. NNN1Smith, 2003. "Why are they worried? Concern about AIDS in rural Malawi," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(9), pages 279-318, September.
    7. Nicoletta Balbo & Nicola Barban & Melinda Mills, 2013. "Friend and peer effects on entry into marriage and parenthood: A multiprocess approach," Working Papers 056, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    8. FFF1Christoph NNN1Bühler & FFF2Hans-Peter NNN2Kohler, 2003. "Talking about AIDS," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(13), pages 397-438, September.
    9. Guy Stecklov & Alejandro Alexander Weinreb, 2007. "Action, Function, & Structure; Interpreting Network Effects on Behavior in Rural Malawi," Working Papers 07-12, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
    10. Futoshi Yamauchi & Sakiko Tanabe, 2008. "Nonmarket networks among migrants: evidence from metropolitan Bangkok, Thailand," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 649-664, July.
    11. Sheabo Dessalegn, S., 2017. "Social capital and maternal health care use in rural Ethiopia," Other publications TiSEM bb0ec225-4ec3-4028-90d6-1, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    12. Robert G. White & Laura Bernardi, 2008. "Close kin influences on fertility behavior," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2008-024, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    13. Christine Bachrach, 2014. "Culture and Demography: From Reluctant Bedfellows to Committed Partners," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(1), pages 3-25, February.
    14. Lesley Newson & Peter J. Richerson, 2009. "Why Do People Become Modern? A Darwinian Explanation," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(1), pages 117-158.
    15. Zakharenko, Roman, 2009. "Children Versus Ideas: an “Influential” Theory of Demographic Transition," MPRA Paper 17478, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. FFF1Enid NNN1Schatz, 2003. "Comparing, Contextualizing, and Conceptualizing," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(5), pages 143-174, September.
    17. Sara Yeatman & Jenny Trinitapoli, 2008. "Beyond denomination: The relationship between religion and family planning in rural Malawi," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(55), pages 1851-1882, October.
    18. Leone, Tiziana & Padmadas, Sabu S. & Matthews, Zoë, 2008. "Community factors affecting rising caesarean section rates in developing countries: An analysis of six countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(8), pages 1236-1246, October.
    19. Paul Mathews & Rebecca Sear, 2013. "Does the kin orientation of a British woman’s social network influence her entry into motherhood?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(11), pages 313-340, February.
    20. Heidi Hogset & Christopher B. Barrett, 2010. "Social Learning, Social Influence, and Projection Bias: A Caution on Inferences Based on Proxy Reporting of Peer Behavior," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(3), pages 563-589, April.
    21. Sayaka Nakamura, 2016. "Determinants of contraceptive choice among Japanese women: ten years after the pill approval," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 553-575, September.
    22. Mertens, Frédéric & Saint-Charles, Johanne & Mergler, Donna, 2012. "Social communication network analysis of the role of participatory research in the adoption of new fish consumption behaviors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(4), pages 643-650.
    23. Edmonds, Joyce K. & Hruschka, Daniel & Bernard, H. Russell & Sibley, Lynn, 2012. "Women’s social networks and birth attendant decisions: Application of the Network-Episode Model," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 452-459.
    24. Songsermsawas, Tisorn & Baylis, Kathy & Chhatre, Ashwini & Michelson, Hope, 2016. "Can Peers Improve Agricultural Revenue?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 163-178.
    25. FFF1Susan NNN1Watkins & FFF2Ina NNN2Warriner, 2003. "How do we know we need to control for selectivity?," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(4), pages 109-142, September.

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