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The Labor Market Consequences of Internal Migration in Turkey

  • Ali Berker


    (Abant Ýzzet Baysal University)

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    During the last 30 years, Turkey has undergone profound economic and social transformations, including fundamental shifts from the state-oriented economy to the market-oriented economy; large scale modernization investments in telecommunication and transportation services; and the low-intensity ongoing armed-conflict concentrated in the country’s Southeastern Region. For such a period, using the 1990 and 2000 Turkish Censuses, I evaluated the labor market consequences of internal migration that might have been sparked by such significant economic and social changes. Overall, the results suggest that provinces with a higher share of recent migrants may observe decreases in their native population’ labor market opportunities. While this adverse impact of the recent migrant inflows remains to be robust, it exhibits heterogeneity with respect to the skill level of natives, as well as for the labor market outcomes of different native and migrant groups.

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    Paper provided by Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum in its series Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers with number 1029.

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    Length: 46 pages
    Date of creation: Oct 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:koc:wpaper:1029
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    1. Adriana Kugler & Mutlu Yuksel, 2008. "Effects of Low-Skilled Immigration on U.S. Natives: Evidence from Hurricane Mitch," NBER Working Papers 14293, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Phan, Diep & Coxhead, Ian, 2008. "Interprovincial Migration and Inequality During Vietnam's Transition," Staff Paper Series 507, University of Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    3. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Tanabe, Sakiko, 2003. "Nonmarket networks among migrants," FCND discussion papers 169, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Ethan Lewis, 2005. "Immigration, skill mix, and the choice of technique," Working Papers 05-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    5. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jennifer Hunt, 1992. "The impact of the 1962 repatriates from Algeria on the French labor market," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(3), pages 556-572, April.
    7. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:118:y:2003:i:2:p:549-599 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Ethan Lewis, 2004. "How did the Miami labor market absorb the Mariel immigrants?," Working Papers 04-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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