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Should the central bank issue e-money?

Author

Listed:
  • Charles M. Kahn

    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Federal Reserve Bank of New York
    University of Chicago
    Harvard University)

  • Francisco Rivadeneyra
  • Tsz-Nga Wong

    (SUNY
    Binghamton U)

Abstract

Should a central bank take over the provision of e-money, a circulable electronic liability? We discuss how e-money technology changes the tradeoff between public and private provision, and the tradeoff between e-money and a central bank's existing liabilities like bank notes and reserves. The tradeoffs depend on i) the technological setup of the e-money system (as a token or an account; centralized or decentralized); ii) the potential improvement in the implementation and transmission of monetary policy; iii) the risks to safety and privacy from cyber attacks; and iv) the uncertain impact on banks' efficiency and financial stability. The most compelling argument for central banks to issue e-money is to address competition problems in the banking sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles M. Kahn & Francisco Rivadeneyra & Tsz-Nga Wong, 2019. "Should the central bank issue e-money?," Working Papers 2019-3, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2019-003
    DOI: doi.org/10.20955/wp.2019.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Chiu & Janet Hua Jiang & Seyed Mohammadreza Davoodalhosseini & Yu Zhu, 2019. "Central Bank Digital Currency and Banking," 2019 Meeting Papers 862, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Emanuele Borgonovo & Stefano Caselli & Alessandra Cillo & Donato Masciandaro & Giovanno Rabitti, 2018. "Cryptocurrencies, central bank digital cash, traditional money: does privacy matter?," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1895, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    central bank digital currencies; e-money; cryptocurrencies; token- and account- based payment payments;

    JEL classification:

    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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