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Using extraneous information to analyze monetary policy in transition economies

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  • William T. Gavin
  • David M. Kemme

Abstract

Empirical work in macroeconomics is plagued by small sample size and large idiosyncratic variation. This problem is especially severe in the case of transition economies. We use a mixed estimation method incorporating information from OECD country data to estimate the parameters of a reduced-form transition economy model. An exactly identified structural VAR model is then constructed to analyze monetary policy. The OECD information increases the precision of the impulse response functions in the transition economies. The method provides a systematic way to use extraneous information to analyze monetary policy in the transition economies where data availability is limited.

Suggested Citation

  • William T. Gavin & David M. Kemme, 2007. "Using extraneous information to analyze monetary policy in transition economies," Working Papers 2004-034, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2004-034
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    Cited by:

    1. Minea, Alexandru & Rault, Christophe, 2011. "External monetary shocks and monetary integration: Evidence from the Bulgarian currency board," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 2271-2281, September.
    2. Alfred A. Haug & Tomasz Jedrzejowicz & Anna Sznajderska, 2013. "Combining Monetary and Fiscal Policy in an SVAR for a Small Open Economy," Working Papers 1313, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2013.
    3. Luis Carranza & Jose E. Galdon-Sanchez & Javier Gomez-Biscarri, 2010. "Understanding the Relationship between Financial Development and Monetary Policy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(5), pages 849-864, November.
    4. Magdalena Borys & Roman Horváth & Michal Franta, 2009. "The effects of monetary policy in the Czech Republic: an empirical study," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 36(4), pages 419-443, November.
    5. Soyoung Kim & Doo Yang, 2011. "The Impact of Capital Inflows on Asset Prices in Emerging Asian Economies: Is Too Much Money Chasing Too Little Good?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 293-315, April.
    6. Marek Jarocinski, 2010. "Responses to monetary policy shocks in the east and the west of Europe: a comparison," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(5), pages 833-868.
    7. Vasile Cocris & Anca Elena Nucu, 2013. "Monetary policy and financial stability: empirical evidence from Central and Eastern European countries," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 13(1), pages 75-98, July.
    8. Zlatina Balabanova & Ralf Brüggemann, 2012. "External Information and Monetary Policy Transmission in New EU Member States: Results from FAVAR Models," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2012-05, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    9. Zina CIORAN, 2015. "Var Analysis Of The Transmission Mechanism Of Monetary Policy In Romania," SEA - Practical Application of Science, Fundația Română pentru Inteligența Afacerii, Editorial Department, issue 7, pages 153-164, April.
    10. Jimborean, Ramona, 2009. "The role of banks in the monetary policy transmission in the new EU member states," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 360-375, December.

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    Keywords

    Monetary policy ; Macroeconomics;

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