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A common model approach to macroeconomics: using panel data to reduce sampling error

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  • William T. Gavin
  • Athena T. Theodorou

Abstract

Is there a common model inherent in macroeconomic data? Macroeconomic theory suggests that market economies of various nations should share many similar dynamic patterns; as a result, individual-country empirical models, for a wide variety of countries often include the same variables. Yet, empirical studies often find important roles for idiosyncratic shocks in the differing macroeconomic performance of countries. We use forecasting criteria to examine the macro-dynamic behavior of 15 OECD countries in terms of a small set of familiar, widely–used core economic variables, omitting country-specific shocks. We find this small set of variables and a simple VAR “common model” strongly supports the hypothesis that many industrialized nations have similar macroeconomic dynamics.

Suggested Citation

  • William T. Gavin & Athena T. Theodorou, 2004. "A common model approach to macroeconomics: using panel data to reduce sampling error," Working Papers 2003-045, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2003-045
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    1. repec:ipf:psejou:v:41:y:2017:i:1:p:39-69 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Tuomas A. Peltonen & Ricardo M. Sousa & Isabel S. Vansteenkiste, 2011. "Fundamentals, Financial Factors, and the Dynamics of Investment in Emerging Markets," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(0), pages 88-105, May.
    3. YUAN, Chunming & CHEN, Ruo, 2015. "Policy transmissions, external imbalances, and their impacts: Cross-country evidence from BRICS," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-24.
    4. Brei, Michael & Buzaushina, Almira, 2015. "International financial shocks in emerging markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 51-74.
    5. Rui Esteves & João Tovar Jalles, 2016. "Like Father Like Sons? The Cost of Sovereign Defaults in Reduced Credit to the Private Sector," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(7), pages 1515-1545, October.
    6. Leonardo Gambacorta & Boris Hofmann & Gert Peersman, 2014. "The Effectiveness of Unconventional Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound: A Cross‐Country Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(4), pages 615-642, June.
    7. Galvao Jr., Antonio F., 2011. "Quantile regression for dynamic panel data with fixed effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 164(1), pages 142-157, September.
    8. Jonida Bollano & Delina Ibrahimaj, 2015. "Current Account Determinats in Central Eastern European Countries," IHEID Working Papers 22-2015, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    9. Hristov, Nikolay & Hülsewig, Oliver & Wollmershäuser, Timo, 2012. "Loan supply shocks during the financial crisis: Evidence for the Euro area," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 569-592.
    10. Badi H. Baltagi, 2008. "Forecasting with panel data," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 153-173.
    11. Gavin, William T. & Kemme, David M., 2009. "Using extraneous information to analyze monetary policy in transition economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, pages 868-879.
    12. Baltagi, Badi H., 2013. "Panel Data Forecasting," Handbook of Economic Forecasting, Elsevier.
    13. Luca Agnello & Ricardo M. Sousa, 2013. "Fiscal Policy And Asset Prices," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 154-177, April.
    14. Badi H. Baltagi, 2013. "Dynamic panel data models," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Empirical Macroeconomics, chapter 10, pages 229-248 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Ana Mitreska & Sultanija Bojcheva – Terzijan, 2017. "Panel Estimation of the Impact of Foreign Banks Presence on Selected Banking Indicators in Macedonia," Working Papers 2017-04, National Bank of the Republic of Macedonia.
    16. Rilind Kabashi, 2017. "Macroeconomic effects of fiscal policy in the European Union, with particular reference to transition countries," Public Sector Economics, Institute of Public Finance, pages 39-69.
    17. Gert Peersman, 2012. "Effectiveness of Unconventional Monetary Policy at the Zero Lower Bound," 2012 Meeting Papers 400, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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    Keywords

    Time-series analysis ; Forecasting;

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