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International Dollar Flows

Author

Listed:
  • Ayelen Banegas
  • Ruth Judson
  • Charles Sims
  • Viktors Stebunovs

Abstract

Using confidential Federal Reserve data, we study the factors driving U.S. banknote flows between the United States and other countries. These flows are a significant component of capital flows in emerging market economies, where physical U.S. currency functions as a safe asset and precautionary demand for U.S. banknotes is a form of flight to quality. Prior to the global financial crisis, country-specific factors, including local economic uncertainty, largely explain the volume and heterogeneity of the flows. Since the crisis, global factors, particularly, global economic uncertainty, explain the flows markedly well. Further, precautionary demand for U.S. banknotes is not episodic.

Suggested Citation

  • Ayelen Banegas & Ruth Judson & Charles Sims & Viktors Stebunovs, 2015. "International Dollar Flows," International Finance Discussion Papers 1144, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1144
    DOI: 10.17016/IFDP.2015.1144
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.17016/IFDP.2015.1144
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Judson, Ruth, 2017. "The Death of Cash? Not So Fast: Demand for U.S. Currency at Home and Abroad, 1990-2016," International Cash Conference 2017 – War on Cash: Is there a Future for Cash? 162910, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    2. Morten Linnemann Bech & Umar Faruqui & Frederik Ougaard & Cristina Picillo, 2018. "Payments are a-changin' but cash still rules," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital flows; currency flows; U.S. banknotes; safe asset; emerging market economies; economic uncertainty; flight to quality; capital flight; money demand.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General

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