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Enforcement and immigrant location choice

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  • Watson, Tara

    () (Williams College)

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of local immigration enforcement regimes on the migration decisions of the foreign-born. Specifically, the analysis uses individual-level American Community Survey data to examine the effect of recent 287(g) agreements, which allow state and local law enforcement agencies to enforce Federal immigration law. The results suggest that one type of 287(g) agreement—the controversial local "task force" model emphasizing street enforcement—nearly doubles the propensity for the foreign-born to relocate within the United States. The largest effects are observed among non-citizens with at least some college education, suggesting that 287(g) policies may be missing their intended targets. No similar effect is found for the native-born. After the extreme case of Maricopa County is excluded, there is no evidence that local enforcement causes the foreign-born to exit the United States or deters their entry from abroad or from elsewhere in the United States. Rather, 287(g) task force agreements encourage the foreign-born to move to a new Census division or region within the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Watson, Tara, 2013. "Enforcement and immigrant location choice," Working Papers 13-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbwp:13-10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2016. "Do state work eligibility verification laws reduce unauthorized immigration?," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-17, December.
    2. repec:eee:pubeco:v:158:y:2018:i:c:p:63-78 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sarah Bohn & Todd Pugatch, 2015. "U.S. Border Enforcement and Mexican Immigrant Location Choice," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(5), pages 1543-1570, October.
    4. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Fernando Lozano, 2015. "On The Effectiveness Of Sb1070 In Arizona," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 335-351, January.
    5. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Thitima Puttitanun, 2014. "Remittances and immigration enforcement," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-26, December.
    6. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0627-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:bla:indres:v:56:y:2017:i:2:p:236-262 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Julia Shu-Huah Wang & Neeraj Kaushal, 2018. "Health and Mental Health Effects of Local Immigration Enforcement," NBER Working Papers 24487, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Ifft, Jennifer & Jodlowski, Margaret, 2016. "Is ICE Freezing US Agriculture? The Impact of Local Immigration Enforcement on Farm Profitability and Structure," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235950, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo & Thitima Puttitanun, 2015. "Immigration Enforcement, Parent–Child Separations, and Intent to Remigrate by Central American Deportees," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(6), pages 1825-1851, December.
    11. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Lozano, Fernando A., 2017. "Interstate Mobility Patterns of Likely Unauthorized Immigrants: Evidence from Arizona," IZA Discussion Papers 10685, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. repec:eee:socmed:v:191:y:2017:i:c:p:19-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Watson, Tara, 2013. "Immigrants as a potential source of growth for New England’s highly skilled workforce," New England Public Policy Center Policy Brief, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

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    JEL classification:

    • K00 - Law and Economics - - General - - - General (including Data Sources and Description)

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