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Income Elasticity of Gasoline Demand: A Meta-Analysis

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Abstract

In this paper we quantitatively synthesize empirical estimates of the income elasticity of gasoline demand reported in previous studies. The studies cover many countries and report a mean elasticity of 0.28 for the short run and 0.66 for the long run. We show, however, that these mean estimates are biased upwards because of publication bias—the tendency to suppress negative and insignificant estimates of the elasticity. Using mixed-effects multilevel meta-regression we filter out publication bias from the literature. Our results suggest that the income elasticity of gasoline demand is smaller than commonly thought: the corrected estimate is 0.1 for the short run and 0.46 for the long run.

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  • Tomas Havranek & Ondrej Kokes, 2013. "Income Elasticity of Gasoline Demand: A Meta-Analysis," Working Papers IES 2013/02, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Apr 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:wpaper:wp2013_02
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    Keywords

    Gasoline; income elasticity; publication bias; meta-analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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