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Pricing to Habits and the Law of One Price


  • Morten O. Ravn
  • Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe
  • Martin Uribe


This paper proposes a novel international transmission mechanism based on the assumption of deep habits. The term deep habits stands for a preference specification according to which consumers form habits on a good-by-good basis. Under deep habits, firms face more elastic demand functions in markets where nonhabitual demand is high relative to habitual demand, creating an incentive to price discriminate. We refer to this type of price discrimination as pricing to habits. In the presence of pricing to habits, innovations to domestic aggregate demand induce a decline in markups in the domestic country but not abroad, leading to a departure from the law of one price. In this way, the proposed pricing-to-habit mechanism can explain the observation that prices of the same good across countries, expressed in the same currency, vary over the business cycle. Furthermore, it can account for the empirical fact that in response to a positive domestic demand shock, such as an increase in government spending, the real exchange rate depreciates, domestic consumption expands, and the trade balance deteriorates.

Suggested Citation

  • Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2006. "Pricing to Habits and the Law of One Price," Economics Working Papers ECO2006/40, European University Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:eui:euiwps:eco2006/40

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1997. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1243-1272, September.
    2. Jordi Galí & J. David López-Salido & Javier Vallés, 2007. "Understanding the Effects of Government Spending on Consumption," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(1), pages 227-270, March.
    3. Froot, Kenneth A & Klemperer, Paul D, 1989. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through When Market Share Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 637-654, September.
    4. Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2007. "Pricing to Habits and the Law of One Price," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 232-238, May.
    5. Jordi Gali Garreta & Pau Rabanal, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations; How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data?," IMF Working Papers 04/234, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Morten Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2006. "Deep Habits," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 195-218.
    7. Crucini, Mario J. & Shintani, Mototsugu, 2008. "Persistence in law of one price deviations: Evidence from micro-data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 629-644, April.
    8. Jordi Gali Garreta & Pau Rabanal, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations; How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data?," IMF Working Papers 04/234, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Galí, Jordi & López-Salido, David & Vallés, Javier, 2004. "Understanding the effects of government spending on consumption," Working Paper Series 339, European Central Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Dedola, Luca & Leduc, Sylvain, 2010. "Optimal Monetary Policy in Open Economies," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 16, pages 861-933 Elsevier.
    2. Moore, Michael J. & Roche, Maurice J., 2010. "Solving exchange rate puzzles with neither sticky prices nor trade costs," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1151-1170, October.
    3. Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2007. "Pricing to Habits and the Law of One Price," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 232-238, May.
    4. S M Ali Abbas & Jacques Bouhga-Hagbe & Antonio Fatás & Paolo Mauro & Ricardo C Velloso, 2011. "Fiscal Policy and the Current Account," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(4), pages 603-629, November.
    5. Alessio Emanuele BIONDO, 2010. "The Law of One Price: Survey of a Failure," Theoretical and Practical Research in Economic Fields, ASERS Publishing, vol. 0(2), pages 168-182, December.
    6. Lukasz A. Drozd & Jaromir B. Nosal, 2012. "Understanding International Prices: Customers as Capital," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 364-395, February.
    7. Drozd, Lukasz A. & Nosal, Jaromir B., 2010. "Pricing to Market in Business Cycle Models," MPRA Paper 22513, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. jae sim & Raphael Schoenle & Egon Zakrajsek & Simon Gilchrist, 2015. "Financial Heterogeneity and Monetary Union," 2015 Meeting Papers 1327, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Margarita Katsimi & Vassilis Sarantides, 2012. "The Impact Of Fiscal Policy On Profits," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(4), pages 1050-1068, October.
    10. Ariel Burstein & Gita Gopinath, 2013. "International Prices and Exchange Rates," NBER Working Papers 18829, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Svetlana Fedoseeva & Laura M. Werner, 2016. "How linear is pricing-to-market? Empirical assessment of hysteresis and asymmetry of PTM," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1065-1090, May.
    12. Punnoose Jacob & Lenno Uuskula, 2016. "Deep habits and exchange rate pass-through," CAMA Working Papers 2016-17, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    13. Chang, Ming-Jen & Chang, Juin-Jen & Shieh, Jhy-Yuan, 2014. "Keeping up with the Joneses and exchange rate volatility in a Redux model," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 569-584.
    14. Burstein, Ariel & Gopinath, Gita, 2014. "International Prices and Exchange Rates," Handbook of International Economics, Elsevier.
    15. Maurice J. Roche & Michael J. Moore, 2010. "For Rich or for Poor: When does Uncovered Interest Parity Hold?," Working Papers 015, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance


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