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Globalisation : trends, issues and macro implications for the EU

  • Cécile Denis
  • Kieran Mc Morrow
  • Werner Röger

Globalisation, defined as an increasingly integrated world economy, has the potential to generate the largest structural upheaval in economies since the industrial revolution. As in the past, this process is being underpinned by both technological change and by a shift in policies in many countries towards a more open, market based, system of economic governance. These policies reflect the realities of a new world order where knowledge creation and absorption and the flexibility of the regulatory and institutional frameworks will be the key determinants of the economic fortunes of economies. This paper examines the historical empirical evidence regarding globalisation and quantifies the macro benefits and costs for the EU over the coming decades.

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File URL: http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/publications/publication668_en.pdf
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Paper provided by Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission in its series European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 with number 254.

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Length: 95 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:euf:ecopap:0254
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