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When the past is present – The ratchet effect in the local commons

  • Gerlinde Fellner
  • Magdalena Margreiter
  • Nuria Oses Eraso

The indirect evolutionary approach integrates forward-looking evaluation of opportunities and adaptation in the light of the past. Subjective motivation determines behavior, but long-run evolutionary success of motivational types depends on objective factors only, what can justify intrinsic aversion to inequality in reward allocation games. Whereas earlier analysis has typically been restricted to a particular game, we consider a more complex environment by combining different games which – studied in isolation – yield opposite implications for the survival of inequality aversion. Persistent divergence between intrinsic motivation and true material success is possible depending on the type of inequality aversion considered as well as on agents’ ability to discriminate between the different games they face.

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Paper provided by Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group in its series Papers on Strategic Interaction with number 2003-23.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:esi:discus:2003-23
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