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Voting behavior and public employment in Nazi Germany

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  • Maurer, Stephan E.

Abstract

This paper analyzes whether the German National Socialists used economic policies to reward their voters after coming to power in 1933. Using newly-collected data on public employment from the German censuses in 1925, 1933, and 1939 and addressing the potential endogeneity of the NSDAP vote share in 1933 by way of an instrumental variables strategy based on a similar party in Imperial Germany, I find that cities with higher NSDAP vote shares experienced a relative increase in public employment: for every additional percentage point in the vote share, the number of public employment jobs increased by around 2.5 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Maurer, Stephan E., 2017. "Voting behavior and public employment in Nazi Germany," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 83589, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:83589
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General

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