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Cities, growth and poverty: evidence review


  • Lee, Neil
  • Sissons, Paul
  • Hughes, Ceri
  • Green, Anne
  • Atfield, Gaby
  • Adam, Duncan
  • Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés


Cities are drivers of economic growth, but how does growth affect poverty? This report explores the connection between growth and poverty in UK cities, and examines how strategies for economic growth and poverty reduction can be aligned. The report finds that: - There is no guarantee that economic growth will reduce poverty – in some economically expanding cities poverty has stayed the same or increased; - Employment growth has the greatest impact on poverty, but if jobs are low-paid or go to workers living outside the area, the impact is minimal; - Increased output risks worsening poverty because it can lead to increases in the cost of living; - Some cities are tackling this by promoting employment in expanding sectors or providing training for disadvantaged groups so they can access opportunities associated with major infrastructure projects.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Neil & Sissons, Paul & Hughes, Ceri & Green, Anne & Atfield, Gaby & Adam, Duncan & Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés, 2014. "Cities, growth and poverty: evidence review," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 55799, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:55799

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ioannis Kaplanis, 2010. "Local Human Capital and Its Impact on Local Employment Chances in Britain," SERC Discussion Papers 0040, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ludovica Gambaro & Heather Joshi & Ruth Lupton & Mary Clare Lennon, 2014. "A Pragmatic Approach to Measuring Neighbourhood Poverty Change," DoQSS Working Papers 14-08, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    2. Neil Lee & Paul Sissons, 2016. "Inclusive growth? The relationship between economic growth and poverty in British cities," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 48(11), pages 2317-2339, November.
    3. repec:taf:regstd:v:51:y:2017:i:3:p:478-489 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Neil Lee, 2017. "Powerhouse of cards? Understanding the ‘Northern Powerhouse’," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3), pages 478-489, March.
    5. Siegel, Beth & Winey, Devon & Kornetsky, Adam, 2015. "Pathways to system change: the design of multisite, cross-sector initiatives," Community Development Investment Center Working Paper 2015-3, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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