IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Local Human Capital and Its Impact on Local Employment Chances in Britain

  • Ioannis Kaplanis

This paper examines how high human capital in a locality is associated with the employment outcomes of individuals. A probit model is used to examine how the employment probability of otherwise similar working age males is associated with changes in the share of degree holders in the local area. Different econometric specifications are employed in order to shed light on the positive effect found and its possible causes. The paper discusses three main accounts, referring to the consumption demand, productivity spillovers and production complementarities. For Britain, it is found that the share of high skill residents in a locality has a strong positive impact on the local employment chances of men with no qualifications. The effect on the local employment chances of the other educational groups is either insignificant or significant negative. These results are consistent with the consumer demand hypothesis that the presence of high educated, high income individuals in a locality boosts the demand for local low skill services. On the other hand, when the share of skilled workers is used, the results hint on possible simultaneous effect of production complementarities and productivity spillovers. However, the analysis points to the existing limitations of successfully isolating the consumption demand and the production function mechanisms and calls for further research.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/serc/publications/download/sercdp0040.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0040.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Jan 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0040
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2007. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 118-133, February.
  2. Ian Richard Gordon & Ioannis Kaplanis, 2014. "Accounting for Big-City Growth in Low-Paid Occupations: Immigration and/or Service-Class Consumption," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 90(1), pages 67-90, 01.
  3. Edward L. Glaeser & David C. Mare, 1994. "Cities and Skills," NBER Working Papers 4728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Ioannis Kaplanis, 2010. "Wage Effects from Changes in Local Human Capital in Britain," SERC Discussion Papers 0039, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  5. Ian R. Gordon & Philip McCann, 2005. "Innovation, agglomeration, and regional development," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(5), pages 523-543, October.
  6. Paul Krugman, 1990. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 3275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Ioannis Kaplanis, 2006. "The Geography of Employment Polarisation in Britain," ERSA conference papers ersa06p597, European Regional Science Association.
  8. Daniel Heuermann & Benedikt Halfdanarson & Jens Suedekum, 2010. "Human Capital Externalities and the Urban Wage Premium: Two Literatures and their Interrelations," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(4), pages 749-767, April.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0040. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.