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Tourism Induced Contribution to Diesel Oil and Gasoline Consumption

  • Mohcine Bakhat

    ()

    (Rede (Universidade de Vigo) and Economics for Energy)

  • Jaume Roselló

    (University of the Balearic Islands)

During the last years, tourism has received increasing attention due to its environmental impacts. Particularly, the use of fossil energy has been considered as one of its major environmental problems and also one of the factors directly related to climatic change. Various studies have estimated the contribution of tourism to environmental damage using a sectorial perspective, evaluating the impact of air transport, the accommodation sector or other tourism-related economic sector. In this paper, the contribution of tourism to diesel oil and gasoline consumption is considered from a broader framework, taking advantage of monthly information collected from different sources. Considering the case study of the Balearic Islands (Spain) and using a conventional econometric model that includes data for monthly stocks of tourists, the influence of tourism on diesel oil and gasoline demand is estimated.

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File URL: http://www.eforenergy.org/docpublicaciones/documentos-de-trabajo/WP05-2011-1.pdf
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Paper provided by Economics for Energy in its series Working Papers with number 05-2011.

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Length: 16 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:efe:wpaper:05-2011
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.eforenergy.org

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