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Benefits and costs of liquidity regulation

Author

Listed:
  • Hoerova, Marie
  • Mendicino, Caterina
  • Nikolov, Kalin
  • Schepens, Glenn
  • Heuvel, Skander Van den

Abstract

This paper investigates the costs and benefits of liquidity regulation. We find that liquidity tools are beneficial but cannot completely remove the need for Lender of Last Resort (LOLR) interventions by the central bank. Full compliance with current Liquidity Coverage Ratio (LCR) and Net Stable Funding Ratio (NSFR) rules would have reduced banks’ reliance on publicly provided liquidity during the global financial crisis without removing such assistance altogether. The paper also investigates the output costs of introducing the LCR and NSFR using two macro-financial models. We find these costs to be modest. JEL Classification: E44, E58, G21, G28

Suggested Citation

  • Hoerova, Marie & Mendicino, Caterina & Nikolov, Kalin & Schepens, Glenn & Heuvel, Skander Van den, 2018. "Benefits and costs of liquidity regulation," Working Paper Series 2169, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20182169
    Note: 919428
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ecb.europa.eu//pub/pdf/scpwps/ecb.wp2169.en.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlson, Mark A. & Duygan-Bump, Burcu & Nelson, William R., 2015. "Why Do We Need Both Liquidity Regulations and a Lender of Last Resort? A Perspective from Federal Reserve Lending during the 2007-09 U.S. Financial Crisis," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-11, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    2. Enrico Perotti & Javier Suarez, 2011. "A Pigovian Approach to Liquidity Regulation," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(4), pages 3-41, December.
    3. Giammarino, Ronald M & Lewis, Tracy R & Sappington, David E M, 1993. " An Incentive Approach to Banking Regulation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(4), pages 1523-1542, September.
    4. repec:wly:jmoncb:v:50:y:2018:i:6:p:1271-1297 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Caterina Mendicino & Kalin Nikolov & Javier Suarez & Dominik Supera, 2018. "Optimal Dynamic Capital Requirements," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(6), pages 1271-1297, September.
    6. Laurent Clerc & Alexis Derviz & Caterina Mendicino & Stephane Moyen & Kalin Nikolov & Livio Stracca & Javier Suarez & Alexandros P. Vardoulakis, 2015. "Capital Regulation in a Macroeconomic Model with Three Layers of Default," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(3), pages 9-63, June.
    7. Wedow, Michael & Schmitz, Stefan & Rahmouni-Rousseau, Imene & Momtsia, Angeliki & Luskin, Alaoishe & Junius, Kerstin & Fonseca Coutinho, Cristina & Bucalossi, Annalisa & Schobert, Franziska & Scalia, , 2016. "Basel III and recourse to Eurosystem monetary policy operations," Occasional Paper Series 171, European Central Bank.
    8. Gertler, Mark & Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Queralto, Albert, 2012. "Financial crises, bank risk exposure and government financial policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(S), pages 17-34.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bonner, Clemens & Wedow, Michael & Budnik, Katarzyna & Koban, Anne & Kok, Christoffer & Laliotis, Dimitrios & Meller, Barbara & Melo, Ana Sofia & Moldovan, Iulia & Schmitz, Stefan & Couaillier, Cyril , 2018. "Systemic liquidity concept, measurement and macroprudential instruments," Occasional Paper Series 214, European Central Bank.
    2. repec:nse:ecosta:ecostat_2017_494-495-496_4 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    banking; capital requirements; Central bank; Lender of Last Resort; liquidity regulation;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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