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Regulating Water an Sanitation Network Services. Accounting for Institutional and Informational Constraints

Listed author(s):
  • Daniel Camos-Daurella
  • Antonio Estache

The main purpose of this chapter is to argue that the optimal design of regulation of water and sanitation monopolies should be the outcome of a detailed diagnostic of the institutional constraints impacting the ability of the operator - whether public or private - to deliver the services.Tailoring the regulatory processes and instruments to account for institutional and informational weaknesses stands a better chance of improving the performance of the sector than the adoption of imported standardized or pre-packaged regulatory tools.

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File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/252274/3/2017-28-CAMOS_ESTACHE-regulating.pdf
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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series Working Papers ECARES with number ECARES 2017-28.

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Length: 37 p.
Date of creation: Jun 2017
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/252274
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Web page: http://difusion.ulb.ac.be

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  1. Marson, Marta & Savin, Ivan, 2015. "Ensuring Sustainable Access to Drinking Water in Sub Saharan Africa: Conflict Between Financial and Social Objectives," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 26-39.
  2. McDonald, David A., 2016. "To corporatize or not to corporatize (and if so, how?)," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 107-114.
  3. Laffont,Jean-Jacques, 2005. "Regulation and Development," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521840187, September.
  4. Herrera, Veronica & Post, Alison E., 2014. "Can Developing Countries Both Decentralize and Depoliticize Urban Water Services? Evaluating the Legacy of the 1990s Reform Wave," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 621-641.
  5. Auriol, Emmanuelle & Blanc, Aymeric, 2009. "Capture and corruption in public utilities: The cases of water and electricity in Sub-Saharan Africa," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 203-216, June.
  6. Céline Nauges & Caroline Berg, 2008. "Economies of density, scale and scope in the water supply and sewerage sector: a study of four developing and transition economies," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 144-163, October.
  7. Bent Flyvbjerg, 2014. "What You Should Know About Megaprojects, and Why: An Overview," Papers 1409.0003, arXiv.org.
  8. Caroline van den Berg & Alexander Danilenko, 2011. "The IBNET Water Supply and Sanitation Performance Blue Book," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2545, October.
  9. Antonio Estache & Robert Baldwin & Martin Cave & Martin Lodge, 2010. "Regulation in Developing Economics: A survey of theory and evidence," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/44019, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  10. Alexandros Maziotis & Elisa Calliari & Jaroslav Mysiak, 2013. "Robust Institutions for Sustainable Water Markets: A Survey of the Literature and the Way Forward," Working Papers 2013.58, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
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