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Individual investors and volatility

  • Foucault, Thierry

    ()

  • Themar, David

    ()

  • Sraer, David

    ()

In this paper, the authors test the hypothesis that individual investors contribute to the idiosyncratic volatility of stock returns because they act as noise traders.

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File URL: http://www.hec.fr/var/fre/storage/original/application/bbd5e898998b30e0d01ef3903e457b34.pdf
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Paper provided by HEC Paris in its series Les Cahiers de Recherche with number 899.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: 01 Jul 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ebg:heccah:0899
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  1. Ron Kaniel & Gideon Saar & Sheridan Titman, 2008. "Individual Investor Trading and Stock Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(1), pages 273-310, 02.
  2. Daniel Dorn & Gur Huberman & Paul Sengmueller, 2005. "Correlated Trading and Returns," DNB Working Papers 072, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  3. Dow, James & Rahi, Rohit, 2000. "Should Speculators Be Taxed?," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73(1), pages 89-107, January.
  4. John Y. Campbell, 2001. "Have Individual Stocks Become More Volatile? An Empirical Exploration of Idiosyncratic Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(1), pages 1-43, 02.
  5. Andrade, Sandro C. & Chang, Charles & Seasholes, Mark S., 2008. "Trading imbalances, predictable reversals, and cross-stock price pressure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 406-423, May.
  6. Baker, Malcolm & Savasoglu, Serkan, 2002. "Limited arbitrage in mergers and acquisitions," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 91-115, April.
  7. Soeren Hvidkjaer, 2008. "Small Trades and the Cross-Section of Stock Returns," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(3), pages 1123-1151, May.
  8. John Y. Campbell & Sanford J. Grossman & Jiang Wang, 1993. "Trading Volume and Serial Correlation in Stock Returns," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(4), pages 905-939.
  9. John Y. Campbell & Albert S. Kyle, 1988. "Smart Money, Noise Trading and Stock Price Behavior," NBER Technical Working Papers 0071, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Allen, F. & Gale, D., 1991. "Limited Market Participation and Volatility of Asset Prices," Weiss Center Working Papers 2-92, Wharton School - Weiss Center for International Financial Research.
  11. Artyom Durnev & Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung & Paul Zarowin, 2003. "Does Greater Firm-Specific Return Variation Mean More or Less Informed Stock Pricing?," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(5), pages 797-836, December.
  12. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2002. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-in-Differences Estimates?," NBER Working Papers 8841, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Richard K. Crump & V. Joseph Hotz & Guido W. Imbens & Oscar A. Mitnik, 2006. "Moving the Goalposts: Addressing Limited Overlap in the Estimation of Average Treatment Effects by Changing the Estimand," NBER Technical Working Papers 0330, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Paul H. Kupiec, 1995. "Noise traders, excess volatility, and a securities transactions tax," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 95-26, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  15. Frazzini, Andrea & Lamont, Owen A., 2008. "Dumb money: Mutual fund flows and the cross-section of stock returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 299-322, May.
  16. Guillermo Llorente & Roni Michaely & Gideon Saar & Jiang Wang, 2001. "Dynamic Volume-Return Relation of Individual Stocks," NBER Working Papers 8312, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Grinblatt, Mark & Keloharju, Matti, 2000. "The investment behavior and performance of various investor types: a study of Finland's unique data set," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 43-67, January.
  18. Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1998. "Transaction Taxes and Financial Market Equilibrium," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 71(1), pages 81-118, January.
  19. Amihud, Yakov, 2002. "Illiquidity and stock returns: cross-section and time-series effects," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 31-56, January.
  20. Soeren Hvidkjaer, 2006. "A Trade-Based Analysis of Momentum," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 19(2), pages 457-491.
  21. Biais, B. & Bisiere, C. & Decamps, J.-P., 1997. "Short Sales COnstraints, Liquidity and Price Discovery: An Empirical Analysis on the Paris Bourse," Papers 97.485, Toulouse - GREMAQ.
  22. Umlauf, Steven R., 1993. "Transaction taxes and the behavior of the Swedish stock market," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 227-240, April.
  23. De Long, J. Bradford & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H. & Waldmann, Robert J., 1990. "Noise Trader Risk in Financial Markets," Scholarly Articles 3725552, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  24. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2000. "Trading Is Hazardous to Your Wealth: The Common Stock Investment Performance of Individual Investors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(2), pages 773-806, 04.
  25. Duffee, Gregory R., 1995. "Stock returns and volatility A firm-level analysis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 399-420, March.
  26. Solnik, Bruno, 1990. " The Distribution of Daily Stock Returns and Settlement Procedures: The Paris Bourse," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(5), pages 1601-09, December.
  27. Bessembinder, Hendrik & Venkataraman, Kumar, 2004. "Does an electronic stock exchange need an upstairs market?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 3-36, July.
  28. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2002. "Online Investors: Do the Slow Die First?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(2), pages 455-488, March.
  29. Scruggs, John T., 2007. "Noise trader risk: Evidence from the Siamese twins," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 76-105, February.
  30. Pontiff, Jeffrey, 2006. "Costly arbitrage and the myth of idiosyncratic risk," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 35-52, October.
  31. Jones, Charles M & Seguin, Paul J, 1997. "Transaction Costs and Price Volatility: Evidence from Commission Deregulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(4), pages 728-37, September.
  32. Frank M. Song & Junxi Zhang, 2005. "Securities Transaction Tax and Market Volatility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(506), pages 1103-1120, October.
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