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Does Greater Firm‐Specific Return Variation Mean More or Less Informed Stock Pricing?

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  • Artyom Durnev
  • Randall Morck
  • Bernard Yeung
  • Paul Zarowin

Abstract

Roll [1988] observes low R2 statistics for common asset pricing models due to vigorous firm‐specific return variation not associated with public information. He concludes that this implies “either private information or else occasional frenzy unrelated to concrete information”[p. 56]. We show that firms and industries with lower market model R2 statistics exhibit higher association between current returns and future earnings, indicating more information about future earnings in current stock returns. This supports Roll's first interpretation: higher firm‐specific return variation as a fraction of total variation signals more information‐laden stock prices and, therefore, more efficient stock markets.

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  • Artyom Durnev & Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung & Paul Zarowin, 2003. "Does Greater Firm‐Specific Return Variation Mean More or Less Informed Stock Pricing?," Journal of Accounting Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(5), pages 797-836, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:joares:v:41:y:2003:i:5:p:797-836
    DOI: 10.1046/j.1475-679X.2003.00124.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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