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Should Speculators be Taxed?

Author

Listed:
  • Dow, J.
  • Rahi, R.

Abstract

A number of economists have supported the taxation of speculation in financial markets. We examine the welfare economics of such a tax in a model of trading in a financial market where some agents have superiror information. We show that in some cases a tax on speculators may actually increase speculative profits. This occurs if the speculators' benefit from less informative prices offsets the cocts of the tax. The effect on the welfare of other agents depends on how revelation of information changes risk-sharing opportunities in the market. It is possible for the introduction of a tax to cause a Pareto improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Dow, J. & Rahi, R., 1997. "Should Speculators be Taxed?," Economics Working Papers eco97/21, European University Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:eui:euiwps:eco97/21
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jean-Charles Rochet & Jean-Luc Vila, 1994. "Insider Trading without Normality," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(1), pages 131-152.
    2. James Tobin, 1978. "A Proposal for International Monetary Reform," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 4(3-4), pages 153-159, Jul/Oct.
    3. Umlauf, Steven R., 1993. "Transaction taxes and the behavior of the Swedish stock market," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 227-240, April.
    4. Myron S. Scholes, 1981. "The economics of hedging and spreading in futures markets," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 1(2), pages 265-286, June.
    5. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1971. "The Private and Social Value of Information and the Reward to Inventive Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(4), pages 561-574, September.
    6. Spiegel, Matthew & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1992. "Informed Speculation and Hedging in a Noncompetitive Securities Market," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 307-329.
    7. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-1335, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Berentsen, Aleksander & Huber, Samuel & Marchesiani, Alessandro, 2016. "The societal benefit of a financial transaction tax," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 303-323.
    2. Alan D. Morrison, 2004. "Competition and Information Production in Market Maker Models," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(7-8), pages 1171-1190.
    3. Thierry Foucault & David Sraer & David J. Thesmar, 2011. "Individual Investors and Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(4), pages 1369-1406, August.
    4. Dimitri Vayanos & Jiang Wang, 2012. "Liquidity and Asset Returns Under Asymmetric Information and Imperfect Competition," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 25(5), pages 1339-1365.
    5. Hara, Chiaki, 2012. "Asset prices, trading volumes, and investor welfare in markets with transaction costs," CIS Discussion paper series 556, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Cespa, Giovanni, 2002. "Short-term investment and equilibrium multiplicity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(9), pages 1645-1670, October.
    7. Neil McCulloch & Grazia Pacillo, 2010. "The Tobin Tax A Review of the Evidence," Working Paper Series 1611, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    8. Huber, Jürgen & Kleinlercher, Daniel & Kirchler, Michael, 2012. "The impact of a financial transaction tax on stylized facts of price returns—Evidence from the lab," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1248-1266.
    9. Jürgen Antony & Michiel Bijlsma & Adam Elbourne & Marcel Lever & Gijsbert Zwart, 2012. "Financial transaction tax: review and assessment," CPB Discussion Paper 202, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    10. Alexander Gümbel, 2005. "Should short-term speculators be taxed, or subsidised?," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 327-348, August.
    11. Kirchler, Michael & Huber, Jürgen & Kleinlercher, Daniel, 2011. "Market microstructure matters when imposing a Tobin tax—Evidence from the lab," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 586-602.
    12. Sudipto Bhattacharya, 2001. "Insider Trading, Investment, and Liquidity: A Welfare Analysis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(3), pages 1141-1156, June.
    13. Citanna, A. & Polemarchakis, H.M. & Tirelli, M., 2006. "The taxation of trades in assets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 126(1), pages 299-313, January.
    14. Xavier Vives, 2017. "Endogenous Public Information and Welfare in Market Games," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(2), pages 935-963.
    15. Hanke, Michael & Huber, Jürgen & Kirchler, Michael & Sutter, Matthias, 2010. "The economic consequences of a Tobin tax--An experimental analysis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 74(1-2), pages 58-71, May.
    16. Dieler, T., 2014. "Essays on asset trading," Other publications TiSEM ea0c811e-e335-402f-a3e2-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    17. Jürgen Huber & Michael Kirchler & Daniel Kleinlercher & Matthias Sutter, 2014. "Market vs. residence principle : experimental evidence on the effects of a financial transaction tax," Economics Working Papers ECO2014/03, European University Institute.
    18. James Dow & Gary Gorton, 2006. "Noise Traders," NBER Working Papers 12256, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Dominique Dupont & Gabriel Lee, 2007. "Effects of Securities Transaction Taxes on Depth and Bid-Ask Spread," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 31(2), pages 393-400, May.
    20. Chiaki Hara, 2013. "Asset Prices, Trading Volumes, and Investor Welfare in Markets with Transaction Costs," KIER Working Papers 862, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    INFORMATION ; REGULATION ; SOCIAL WELFARE;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General

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