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The Media and the Diffusion of Information in Financial Markets: Evidence from Newspaper Strikes

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  • Peress, Joël

Abstract

The media are increasingly recognized as key players in financial markets. I investigate their causal impact on trading and price formation by examining national newspaper strikes in several countries. Trading volume falls 12% on strike days. The dispersion of stock returns and their intraday volatility are reduced by 7%, while aggregate returns are unaffected. Moreover, an analysis of return predictability indicates that newspapers propagate news from the previous day. These findings demonstrate that the media contribute to the efficiency of the stock market by improving the dissemination of information among investors and its incorporation into stock prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Peress, Joël, 2013. "The Media and the Diffusion of Information in Financial Markets: Evidence from Newspaper Strikes," CEPR Discussion Papers 9653, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9653
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    informational diffusion; market efficiency; media;

    JEL classification:

    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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