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Investor attention and information diffusion from analyst coverage

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  • Lin, Mei-Chen
  • Wu, Chu-Hua
  • Chiang, Ming-Ti

Abstract

This study examines the impact of investor attention and analyst coverage on the diffusion of information. Using trading turnover as a proxy for investor attention, the results show that attention is crucial to the information diffusion from financial analysts. The effect of analyst coverage on improving stock synchronicity is greater when investors are more attentive. Firms with less analyst coverage rely more heavily on investor attention to assimilate information. The lead–lag effect in high and low analyst-following firms is driven by the relative more attention given to firms that have high analyst coverage.

Suggested Citation

  • Lin, Mei-Chen & Wu, Chu-Hua & Chiang, Ming-Ti, 2014. "Investor attention and information diffusion from analyst coverage," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 235-246.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finana:v:34:y:2014:i:c:p:235-246
    DOI: 10.1016/j.irfa.2014.03.006
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    2. Han, Liyan & Xu, Yang & Yin, Libo, 2018. "Forecasting the CNY-CNH pricing differential: The role of investor attention," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 232-247.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Limited attention; Analyst coverage; Lead–lag; Turnover;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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