IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/dun/dpaper/273.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The relationship between public education expenditure and economic growth: The case of India

Author

Listed:
  • Sayantan Ghosh Dastidar
  • Sushil Mohan
  • Monojit Chatterji

Abstract

The paper reviews the theoretical and the empirical case for public investment in education in India. Though the theoretical literature provides a backing for such a policy, the empirical literature fails to find a robust relation between education expenditure and growth. Expenditure on education is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for growth. It seems that the effectiveness of education expenditure depends on the institutional and labour market characteristics of the economy. The effectiveness of education investments also depends on other factors such as trade openness. Due to these aforesaid factors, we argue that the empirical relation between education expenditure and growth for India has been inconsistent.

Suggested Citation

  • Sayantan Ghosh Dastidar & Sushil Mohan & Monojit Chatterji, 2012. "The relationship between public education expenditure and economic growth: The case of India," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 273, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.
  • Handle: RePEc:dun:dpaper:273
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.dundee.ac.uk/media/dundeewebsite/economicstudies/documents/discussion/DDPE_273.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
    2. William F. Blankenau & Nicole B. Simpson & Marc Tomljanovich, 2007. "Public Education Expenditures, Taxation, and Growth: Linking Data to Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 393-397, May.
    3. Sanat Kaul, 2006. "Higher Education in India - Seizing The Opportunity," Development Economics Working Papers 22169, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    4. Sanat Kaul, 2006. "Higher Education in India: Seizing the Opportunity," Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi Working Papers 179, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi, India.
    5. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    6. Barry Bosworth & Susan M. Collins & Arvind Virmani, 2006. "Sources of Growth in the Indian Economy," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 3(1), pages 1-69.
    7. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1991. "The Allocation of Talent: Implications for Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 503-530.
    8. A. M. Nalla Gounden, 1967. "Investment in Education in India," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 2(3), pages 347-358.
    9. Campos, Nauro F. & Nugent, Jeffrey B., 1998. "Institutions and growth: can human capital be a link?," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.
    10. Abhijeet, Chandra, 2010. "Does Government Expenditure on Education Promote Economic Growth? An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 25480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Human Capital and Growth: A Synthesis Report," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 168, OECD Publishing.
    12. Niloy Bose & M. Emranul Haque & Denise R. Osborn, 2007. "Public Expenditure And Economic Growth: A Disaggregated Analysis For Developing Countries," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 75(5), pages 533-556, September.
    13. Pissarides, Christopher A, 1997. "Learning by Trading and the Returns to Human Capital in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 17-32, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ghosh Dastidar, Sayantan & Chatterji, Monojit, 2015. "Public expenditure in different education sectors and economic growth: The Indian experience," MPRA Paper 66903, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ahmed, Riaz, 2016. "Social infrastructure and productivity of manufacturing firms: Evidence from Pakistan," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-038, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Public education expenditure; economic growth; trade openness; India;

    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dun:dpaper:273. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Andrzej Kwiatkowski). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dedunuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.