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Educational Upgrading and Returns to Skills in Latin America. Evidence from a Supply-Demand Framework, 1990-2010

Author

Listed:
  • Leonardo Gasparini

    (CEDLAS - UNLP)

  • Sebastián Galiani

    (Washington University in St. Louis)

  • Guillermo Cruces

    (CEDLAS-UNLP and CONICET)

  • Pablo Acosta

    (World Bank, Human Development, Latin America and Caribbean Region)

Abstract

It has been argued that a factor behind the decline in income inequality in Latin America in the 2000s was the educational upgrading of its labor force. Between 1990 and 2010, the proportion of the labor force in the region with at least secondary education increased from 40 to 60 percent. Concurrently, returns to secondary education completion fell throughout the past two decades, while the 2000s saw a reversal in the increase in the returns to tertiary education experienced in the 1990s. This paper studies the evolution of wage differentials and the trends in the supply of workers by educational level for 16 Latin American countries between 1990 and 2000. The analysis estimates the relative contribution of supply and demand factors behind recent trends in skill premia for tertiary and secondary educated workers. Supplyside factors seem to have limited explanatory power relative to demandside factors, and are only relevant to explain part of the fall in wage premia for highschool graduates. Although there is significant heterogeneity in individual country experiences, on average the trend reversal in labor demand in the 2000s can be partially attributed to the recent boom in commodity prices that could favor the unskilled (nontertiary educated) workforce, although employment patterns by sector suggest that other withinsector forces are also at play, such as technological diffusion or skill mismatches that may reduce the labor productivity of highlyeducated workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Leonardo Gasparini & Sebastián Galiani & Guillermo Cruces & Pablo Acosta, 2012. "Educational Upgrading and Returns to Skills in Latin America. Evidence from a Supply-Demand Framework, 1990-2010," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0127, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  • Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0127
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies

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