IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/apeclt/v13y2006i14p917-924.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Skill premia in Mexico: demand and supply factors

Author

Listed:
  • Gabriel Montes Rojas

Abstract

Skill premia trends for the Mexican urban labour market are analysed, decomposing into demand and supply factors. Moreover, among the former both between and within effects are studied, in line with the Katz and Murphy decomposition. It is shown that demand factors are more important for explaining the initial increment in skill premia, but supply factors are responsible for driving them down. It is concluded that the North American Trade Agreement (NAFTA) favours unskilled labour.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriel Montes Rojas, 2006. "Skill premia in Mexico: demand and supply factors," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(14), pages 917-924.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:13:y:2006:i:14:p:917-924
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850500426145
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/13504850500426145&magic=repec&7C&7C8674ECAB8BB840C6AD35DC6213A474B5
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francisco Galrao Carneiro & Jorge Saba Arbache, 2003. "Assessing the impacts of trade on poverty and inequality," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(15), pages 989-994.
    2. Arnaud Dupuy & Lex Borghans, 2005. "Supply and demand, allocation and wage inequality: an international comparison," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(9), pages 1073-1088.
    3. Robertson, Raymond & Dutkowsky, Donald H., 2002. "Labor adjustment costs in a destination country: the case of Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 29-54, February.
    4. Kang-Shik Choi & Jinook Jeong, 2005. "Technological change and wage premium in a small open economy: the case of Korea," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 119-131.
    5. Harrison, Ann & Hanson, Gordon, 1999. "Who gains from trade reform? Some remaining puzzles," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 125-154, June.
    6. Robertson, Raymond, 2004. "Relative prices and wage inequality: evidence from Mexico," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 387-409, December.
    7. Cragg, Michael Ian & Epelbaum, Mario, 1996. "Why has wage dispersion grown in Mexico? Is it the incidence of reforms or the growing demand for skills?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 99-116, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mehta, Aashish & Mohr, Belinda Acuña, 2012. "Economic Liberalization and Rising College Premiums in Mexico: A Reinterpretation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1908-1920.
    2. Gasparini, Leonardo & Galiani, Sebastian & Cruces, Guillermo & Acosta, Pablo, 2011. "Educational upgrading and returns to skills in Latin America : evidence from a supply-demand framework, 1990-2010," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5921, The World Bank.
    3. Binelli Chiara, 2015. "How the wage-education profile got more convex: evidence from Mexico," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 509-560, July.
    4. Montes-Rojas, Gabriel & Santamaria, Mauricio, 2007. "Sources of productivity growth: Evidence from the Mexican manufacturing sector," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 263-278, December.
    5. Sebastian Galiani & Guillermo Cruces & Pablo Acosta & Leonardo C. Gasparini, 2017. "Educational Upgrading and Returns to Skills in Latin America: Evidence from a Supply-Demand Framework," NBER Working Papers 24015, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:13:y:2006:i:14:p:917-924. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEL20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.