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Globalization and Mexican labor markets

  • Raymond Robertson

North American economic integration has had potentially positive implications for Mexican workers, and the perceived competition between Mexican and U.S. workers may not be as accurate as popularly believed. However, the net gains from integration may overshadow important losses for many workers. These losses explain persistent popular opposition to NAFTA and economic integration. ; Three main policy recommendations emerge from these studies. First, Mexico would continue to benefit, on net, from increased economic integration. Second, to the extent possible, Mexico should work to reduce migration restrictions into the United States. Third, the Mexican government should continue to direct adjustment assistance to rural and less economically active areas. Recent research has shown that workers in these areas are especially susceptible to shocks and that workers in more economically dynamic regions suffer much less from adjustment and job loss.

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File URL: http://dallasfed.org/assets/documents/research/pubs/migration/robertson.pdf
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Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its journal Proceedings.

Volume (Year): (2006)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 61-80

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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddpr:y:2006:p:61-80
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  1. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Nina Pavcnik, 2007. "Distributional Effects of Globalization in Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 12885, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2003. "Does immigration affect wages? A look at occupation-level evidence," Working Papers 0302, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  3. Robertson, Raymond & Kumar, Anil & Dutkowsky, Donald H., 2009. "Purchasing Power Parity and aggregation bias for a developing country: The case of Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 237-243, November.
  4. Giovanni Peri & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 2005. "Rethinking the Gains from Immigration: Theory and Evidence from the U.S," Working Papers 58, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  5. Verhoogen, Eric A, 2007. "Trade, Quality Upgrading and Wage Inequality in the Mexican Manufacturing Sector," CEPR Discussion Papers 6385, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Prachi Mishra, 2006. "Emigration and Wages in Source Countries; Evidence From Mexico," IMF Working Papers 06/86, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Gustavo Gonzaga & Naércio Menezes Filho & Maria Cristina Terra, 2005. "Trade liberalization and the evolution of skill earnings differentials in Brazil," Textos para discussão 503, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
  8. Robertson, Raymond & Dutkowsky, Donald H., 2002. "Labor adjustment costs in a destination country: the case of Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 29-54, February.
  9. Jonathan E. Haskel & Matthew J. Slaughter, 1998. "Does the Sector Bias of Skill-Biased Technical Change Explain Changing Wage Inequality?," NBER Working Papers 6565, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Grossman, Jean Baldwin, 1982. "The Substitutability of Natives and Immigrants in Production," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 64(4), pages 596-603, November.
  11. Hanson, G.H. & Robertson, R. & Spilimbergo, A., 1999. "Does Border Enforcement Protect U.S. Workers from Illegal Immigration?," Working Papers 438, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  12. Feenstra, Robert C. & Hanson, Gordon H., 1997. "Foreign direct investment and relative wages: Evidence from Mexico's maquiladoras," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-4), pages 371-393, May.
  13. Robertson, Raymond, 2004. "Relative prices and wage inequality: evidence from Mexico," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 387-409, December.
  14. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
  15. Revenga, Ana, 1997. "Employment and Wage Effects of Trade Liberalization: The Case of Mexican Manufacturing," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages S20-43, July.
  16. Gordon H. Hanson & Ann Harrison, 1995. "Trade, Technology, and Wage Inequality," NBER Working Papers 5110, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Wood, Adrian, 1997. "Openness and Wage Inequality in Developing Countries: The Latin American Challenge to East Asian Conventional Wisdom," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 33-57, January.
  18. Beyer, Harald & Rojas, Patricio & Vergara, Rodrigo, 1999. "Trade liberalization and wage inequality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 103-123, June.
  19. Cragg, Michael Ian & Epelbaum, Mario, 1996. "Why has wage dispersion grown in Mexico? Is it the incidence of reforms or the growing demand for skills?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 99-116, October.
  20. Zadia M. Feliciano, 2001. "Workers and Trade Liberalization: The Impact of Trade Reforms in Mexico on Wages and Employment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 55(1), pages 95-115, October.
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