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Crafting Labor Policy : Techniques and Lessons from Latin America

Author

Listed:
  • Indermit Gill
  • Claudio E. Montenegro
  • Dorte Domeland

Abstract

Nothing impacts the welfare of individuals and households more directly than employment and earnings opportunities. In developing countries, labor market reform is a crucial component for the success of overall economic policy reforms. Despite success in other areas of economic reform over the past ten years, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile continue to face significant labor policy issues. To reduce the rhetoric around the issues - in Argentina, a high level of unemployment exists; in Brazil, the high costs of public employment have created large government deficits and public debt; and in Chile, there is a growing income inequality and uncertainty of employment - the book uses a systematically quantitative approach. The value of the quantitative methods in analysis is that they can provide frameworks to better understand the effects of various policy actions. The results can then be translated into benefits and costs that policy makers can more easily explain to their constituents. The policy recommendations resulting from the issues analyzed in Crafting Labor Policy: Techniques and Lessons from Latin America may be beneficial to other developing countries enacting labor market reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • Indermit Gill & Claudio E. Montenegro & Dorte Domeland, 2002. "Crafting Labor Policy : Techniques and Lessons from Latin America," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15245, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15245
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Powell, James L., 1984. "Least absolute deviations estimation for the censored regression model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 303-325, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sanchez-Paramo, Carolina & Schady, Norbert, 2003. "Off and running? Technology, trade and the rising demand for skilled workers in Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3015, The World Bank.
    2. Pablo Acosta & Gabriel V. Montes-Rojas, 2008. "Trade Reform and Inequality: The Case of Mexico and Argentina in the 1990s," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(6), pages 763-780, June.
    3. Milan Vodopivec, 2004. "Income Support for the Unemployed : Issues and Options," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14922, June.
    4. Melanie Khamis, 2012. "Is Informal Sector Work an Alternative to Workfare Benefits? The Case of Pre-program Expansion and Economic Crisis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(4), pages 579-593, November.
    5. World Bank, 2006. "Fostering Higher Growth and Employment in the Kingdom of Morocco," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7114, June.
    6. Sunita Kikeri & Thomas Kenyon & Vincent Palmade, 2006. "Reforming the Investment Climate : Lessons for Practitioners," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7096, June.
    7. Attanasio, Orazio & Kugler, Adriana & Meghir, Costas, 2009. "Subsidizing Vocational Training for Disadvantaged Youth in Developing Countries: Evidence from a Randomized Trial," IZA Discussion Papers 4251, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Orazio Attanasio & Adriana Kugler & Costas Meghir, 2008. "Training Disadvantaged Youth in Latin America: Evidence from a Randomized Trial," NBER Working Papers 13931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Kikeri, Sunita & Kenyon,Thomas & Palmade, Vincent, 2006. "Reforming the investment climate : lessons for practitioners," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3986, The World Bank.

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