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The Potential of Electromobility in Austria: An Analysis Based on Hybrid Choice Models

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  • Francisco J. Bahamonde-Birke
  • Tibor Hanappi

Abstract

This paper analyses the impact of the introduction of electromobility in Austria, focusing specifically on the potential demand for electric vehicles in the automotive market. We estimate discrete choice behavioral mixture models considering latent variables; these allows us to deal with this potential demand as well as to analyze the effect of different attributes of the alternatives over the potential market penetration. We find out that some usual assumptions regarding electromobilityalso hold for the Austrian market (e.g. proclivity of green-minded people and reluctance of older individuals), while others are only partially valid (e.g. the power of the engine is not relevant for purely electric vehicles). Along the same line, it was possible to establish that some policy incentives would have a positive effect over the demand for electrical cars, while others - such as an annual Park and Ride subscription or a one-year-ticket for public transportation - would not increase thewillingness-to-pay for electromobility. Our work suggests the existence of reliability thresholds, concerning the availability of charging stations. Finally this paper enunciates and successfully tests an alternative approach to address unreported information regarding income in presence of endogeneity and multiple information sources.

Suggested Citation

  • Francisco J. Bahamonde-Birke & Tibor Hanappi, 2015. "The Potential of Electromobility in Austria: An Analysis Based on Hybrid Choice Models," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1472, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1472
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Francisco J. Bahamonde-Birke & Juan de Dios Ortúzar, 2015. "About the Categorization of Latent Variables in Hybrid Choice Models," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1527, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Francisco J. Bahamonde-Birke, 2015. "Does Transport Behavior Influence Preferences for Elektromobility? An Analysis Based on Person- and Alternative-Specific Error Components," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1529, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Francisco J. Bahamonde-Birke & Juan de Dios Ortúzar, 2015. "Analyzing the Continuity of Attitudinal and Perceptional Indicators in Hybrid Choice Models," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1528, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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    Keywords

    Electromobility; electric vehicles; Hybrid discrete choice model; latent variables; unreported income;
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