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Does Good Advice Come Cheap?: On the Assessment of Risk Preferences in the Lab and in the Field

Author

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  • Andrea Leuermann
  • Benjamin Roth

Abstract

Advice is important for decision making, especially in the financial sector. We investigate how individuals assess risk preferences of others given sociodemographic information or pictures. Both non-professionals and financial professionals participate in this artefactual field experiment. Subjects mainly rely on the other's self-assessment of risk preferences and on gender when forming the belief about someone else's risk preferences. On average, subjects consider themselves to be more risk-tolerant than the person they evaluate. Subjects use their own risk attitude as a reference point for predicting others' risk preferences. This false consensus effect is less pronounced for young professionals than for senior and non-professionals. Furthermore, financial professionals predict risk preferences more accurately compared to non-professionals.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea Leuermann & Benjamin Roth, 2012. "Does Good Advice Come Cheap?: On the Assessment of Risk Preferences in the Lab and in the Field," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 475, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp475
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.407883.de/diw_sp0475.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kristoffer W. Eriksen & Ola Kvaløy & Miguel Luzuriaga, 2017. "Risk-taking on Behalf of Others," CESifo Working Paper Series 6378, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Kvaløy, Ola & Eriksen, Kristoffer & Luzuriaga , Miguel, 2014. "Risk-taking with Other People’s Money," UiS Working Papers in Economics and Finance 2014/21, University of Stavanger.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Risk preferences; financial advice; artefactual field experiment; behavioral finance;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services

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