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Risk Preference Predictions and Gender Stereotypes

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  • Siegrist, Michael
  • Cvetkovich, George
  • Gutscher, Heinz

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  • Siegrist, Michael & Cvetkovich, George & Gutscher, Heinz, 2002. "Risk Preference Predictions and Gender Stereotypes," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 91-102, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:87:y:2002:i:1:p:91-102
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Klar, Yechiel & Medding, Aviva & Sarel, Dan, 1996. "Nonunique Invulnerability: Singular versus Distributional Probabilities and Unrealistic Optimism in Comparative Risk Judgments," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 229-245, August.
    2. Renate Schubert, 1999. "Financial Decision-Making: Are Women Really More Risk-Averse?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 381-385, May.
    3. Fagley, N. S. & Miller, Paul M., 1997. "Framing Effects and Arenas of Choice: Your Money or Your Life?," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 355-373, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Roth, Benjamin & Voskort, Andrea, 2014. "Stereotypes and false consensus: How financial professionals predict risk preferences," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PB), pages 553-565.
    2. Daruvala, Dinky, 2006. "Gender, Risk and Stereotypes," Working Papers in Economics 211, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    3. Hong, Kessely & Bohnet, Iris, 2007. "Status and distrust: The relevance of inequality and betrayal aversion," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 197-213, April.
    4. Tchai Tavor & Sharon Garyn-Tal, 2016. "Further examination of the demographic and social factors affecting risk aversion," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 30(1), pages 95-110, February.
    5. Meier-Pesti, Katja & Penz, Elfriede, 2008. "Sex or gender? Expanding the sex-based view by introducing masculinity and femininity as predictors of financial risk taking," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 180-196, April.
    6. Dinky Daruvala, 2007. "Gender, risk and stereotypes," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 265-283, December.
    7. Lemaster, Philip & Strough, JoNell, 2014. "Beyond Mars and Venus: Understanding gender differences in financial risk tolerance," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 148-160.
    8. Kuhn, Kristine M. & Yockey, Mark D., 2003. "Variable pay as a risky choice: Determinants of the relative attractiveness of incentive plans," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 323-341, March.
    9. repec:eee:jouret:v:92:y:2016:i:4:p:486-499 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Robert Faff & Terrence Hallahan & Michael McKenzie, 2011. "Women and risk tolerance in an aging world," International Journal of Accounting and Information Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 19(2), pages 100-117, June.

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