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Sex or gender? Expanding the sex-based view by introducing masculinity and femininity as predictors of financial risk taking

  • Meier-Pesti, Katja
  • Penz, Elfriede
Registered author(s):

    Women have proven to be more risk-averse than men in investment decisions in many studies. In Western cultures, risk taking is perceived as a masculine characteristic. We therefore hypothesize that the more people associate themselves with masculine attributes, the more financial risks they tend to take, regardless of biological sex. Study 1 showed that differences between men and women in financial risk taking decreased when identification with masculine attributes remained constant. Femininity, on the other hand, was not related to financial risk taking. In the second study, gender priming on masculinity and femininity affected risk taking of the male sample.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V8H-4NT84JJ-1/1/c15d3ddf54db1722117236708254b36a
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Psychology.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 180-196

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:29:y:2008:i:2:p:180-196
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/joep

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